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Hermish 09-11-2007 09:32 PM

Any water experts
 
I just moved, and I am hoping to get my AG going again. I used to just use water straight from the hose since it seemed good. Now I have water that is brownish, and has a strong sulfur smell. So what I am wondering is how this will effect my beer if I use it. I have what seems to be a cheap charcoal filter for the house that doesn't seem to do much. Then I have a PUR filter on my kitchen faucet that makes the water smell and taste fine. Anyone know what kind of filter they have in them? Should I just buy enough water to do 10 gallon batches?

Thanks for any help.

FlyGuy 09-11-2007 10:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hermish
I just moved, and I am hoping to get my AG going again. I used to just use water straight from the hose since it seemed good. Now I have water that is brownish, and has a strong sulfur smell. So what I am wondering is how this will effect my beer if I use it. I have what seems to be a cheap charcoal filter for the house that doesn't seem to do much. Then I have a PUR filter on my kitchen faucet that makes the water smell and taste fine. Anyone know what kind of filter they have in them? Should I just buy enough water to do 10 gallon batches?

Thanks for any help.

Hard to say -- most water filters only get organics. It sounds like filtering might solve your problem, but you could have a tough mineral ion profile to overcome as well. Big activated charcoal filters aren't that expensive, and it sounds like you could use one in the home anyway - it would be worth trying to see if it also improves the taste of your water. If so, water that tastes good often brews good beer. A water ion test might be in order, too.

gfranks7807 09-12-2007 02:12 AM

I'd see if you can get a water analysis from the company that provides your water. If you can't get one from them, send a sample off to a lab that could test it for you. In the meantime, you might want to purchase bottled water until you understand your water chemistry.

Bearcat Brewmeister 09-12-2007 02:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hermish
I just moved, and I am hoping to get my AG going again. I used to just use water straight from the hose since it seemed good. Now I have water that is brownish, and has a strong sulfur smell. So what I am wondering is how this will effect my beer if I use it.

If you wouldn't drink it like that, I wouldn't put it in your beer. Sulphur will accentuate hops but an excess would just make the beer smell like sulphur. The brown could be excess iron or who knows what else.
Quote:

Originally Posted by Hermish
I have a PUR filter on my kitchen faucet that makes the water smell and taste fine. Anyone know what kind of filter they have in them? Should I just buy enough water to do 10 gallon batches?

Not sure what is in a PUR filter but it would have to be an improvement over the brown stuff. If you are buying bottled water, do some research to find out the mineral content of it so you can figure out its hardness and alkalinity and the beer styles that would be appropriate for it or what you would need to add to make it right for the beer you want to make. Careful with just using distilled water as you need some minerals in your water to make good beer. Take the earlier suggestion and get a water test done, then use Palmer's nomograph or my tool in the software forum to figure out what you need to do to tweak your water.

EdWort 09-12-2007 02:43 AM

I use my tap water and when I brew outside, I use a white RV hose with this Culligan in-line RV water filter.

http://www.waterfilters.net/images/F.../RV-600_lg.jpg

The Culligan RV-600 recreational vehicle water filter is a compact system designed to fit in your recreational vehicle or boat. The Culligan RV600 RV filter is a disposable water filter. The Culligan RV-600 filter removes contaminants from your drinking and cooking water. The Culligan RV-600 RV water filter reduces chlorine taste and odor, bad taste and odor, and sediment from your drinking water. The Culligan RV-600 water filter cartridge lasts up to 2000 gallons and is easy to replace with a new RV-600 filter or a Culligan RV-500 filter. The life of the filter also depends on the amount of water used and the amount of contaminants in your drinking water. The Culligan RV-600 has a maximum flow rate of 3 gallons per minute. The Culligan RV-600 has 3/4" hose fittings.

I have well water too that has a sulfer smell to it, but when I run it through this filter it does not smell.

brett 09-12-2007 04:19 AM

You might also want to consider diluting your water with store-bought distilled H2O. A 25/75 distilled/tap should be fine, and if you need to you can go with a 50/50 solution. I dilute to avoid problems with sulfur reacting with the salts I add to the mash water. This can apparently create harsh flavors (especially when crafting a non-bitter beer).

Refer to this page for information on how minerals can affect beer. Make sure and read your water quality report; it is usually available via the web.

You'll probably just have to experiment a bit. Just don't worry too much.

Brewsmith 09-12-2007 05:05 AM

I'll agree with Ed that if your water is that bad you shoud use some sort of charcoal filter if you don't want to buy bottled water.
Quote:

Originally Posted by EdWort
The Culligan RV-600 recreational vehicle water filter is a compact system designed to fit in your recreational vehicle or boat. The Culligan RV600 RV filter is a disposable water filter. The Culligan RV-600 filter removes contaminants from your drinking and cooking water. The Culligan RV-600 RV water filter reduces chlorine taste and odor, bad taste and odor, and sediment from your drinking water. The Culligan RV-600 water filter cartridge lasts up to 2000 gallons and is easy to replace with a new RV-600 filter or a Culligan RV-500 filter. The life of the filter also depends on the amount of water used and the amount of contaminants in your drinking water. The Culligan RV-600 has a maximum flow rate of 3 gallons per minute. The Culligan RV-600 has 3/4" hose fittings.

Did the people that make the Culligan RV600 RV filter have to begin every sentence with "The Culligan RV600 RV filter"? :confused: :D

Hermish 09-12-2007 12:19 PM

Thanks for all of the advice. I think I will probably job with something like that Culligan RV filter. Does anyone have a good place to send out water to be analyzed? I doubt I can get it done from the water company. They seem to be real small. They are not in the phone book, and are a private well that supplies water to the sub-division that I live in which is really only 2 blocks of houses.

FlyGuy 09-12-2007 01:19 PM

Try Ward Labs (www.wardlab.com). They will do a household mineral test for $15 if you send them a sample of your tap water.

Rico6115 09-12-2007 09:23 PM

a nice plumbing company around the area could help ya out there, just with an idea of whats goin on with your water. the problem with sending a sample out is after a day or even 2 the water quality changes giving false readings> thats what i have expierienced in the few times i have had to do water tests (ex. u can see after a day in a plastic bottle sediment falls to the bottom etc.) those filters do work but they all strain out different things. id get that culligan filter first since its workin for EdWort, but remember water is different in all areas so an even safer bet would be luggin bottled water from the store.


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