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Old 07-22-2013, 03:41 AM   #261
fredthecat
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wow 8 days for rogue dead guy? not disputing it, and they've got a way different setup, but what's their process??

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Old 07-22-2013, 04:29 AM   #262
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wow 8 days for rogue dead guy? not disputing it, and they've got a way different setup, but what's their process??
Heard from an ex-brewer who used to brew it. Not sure what in their process lets them go that fast. Just mentioned they know what they're doing with that beer in particular. He did say it only takes them a few hours to carb, which helps.
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Old 07-26-2013, 07:13 PM   #263
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As I am trying to "catch up" and get the pipeline full after restarting my brewing addiction, I have been "cutting corners" from my old process. I no longer have my 15 corny kegs in the garage to keg and keg-as-secondary (although I have the space, my renters stole all that stuff while I was in Iraq). I have been going from 7-day primary to a few 22-oz bottles and the rest in the tap-a-draft bottles.

One 6L goes straight to the fridge and force carb'ed. The other two naturally carb. Two days latter I tap the the forced bottle. 14 days latter I tap the first naturally carb'ed bottle. I taste only minor differences in in the hop profile.

Granted, I have been doing mostly milds and bitters (1.035-1.042 OG) for the summer so that I have good session beers and all have been extract with specialty grain. I am a firm believer in big starters so the next beer gets pitched on the last beer's yeast cake half the time and from 1/2 gal starter (stepped once or twice depending on timing) the rest of the time. I use Whitbread, London II and US-05 for about everything ale.

This weekend I do my first all-grain in almost 6 years...with 2/3'rds of my gravity 3-tier I built when I was 21 (almost 20 years ago). The only change is the switch to an electric HLT and no more welded up step stand...just three nesting platforms that when put together store the brewery in a 4 sq ft space in the garage full of woodworking equipment and race car.

Back on topic, since I "perfected" my all-grain method at about my 9th brew I have only had one beer that significantly benefited from long lagering of any sort and that was a double-bock. Kegged at 2 weeks in the primary then stuck in the winter crawlspace. Drunk and out of beer my neighbor and I sampled it at 3-weeks in the keg and decided to walk to the liquor store for more beer verses finishing the glasses we had. Forgot about it until March (now 8 months in the keg) and tapped it to decide if I should dump it to free up the keg. Best beer I ever made! Gave you massive sulfur farts but everything has a trade-off.

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Old 07-27-2013, 01:40 AM   #264
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^^^
Epic aging beer post.

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Old 11-09-2013, 11:38 AM   #265
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Over the years I have gathered the short turn around of commercial beers is mysteriously aided by a few factors . I have heard;

1) pressurized fermentation - it's harder on the yeast and makes autolysis a real concern, but allegedly pressurized fermentation helps either minimize the production of off-products or, more likely, the speed at which they settle or are re-absorbed

2) filtration - after the yeast are done in the secondary the aging and flavor of a beer are almost exclusively acted upon by settling of off flavor causing compounds. Time will help because they will settle out eventually. In the absence of time if you filter a beer cold you remove a great deal of the fermentation compounds and therefore don't need to age.

3) cold storage/filtration - in terms of haze, the colder you get the beer, the more the micro sized particles (and flavor compounds associated with them) flock together. The bigger the flock the quicker they settle. It's my belief that this is one of the main reasons people who keg believe kegging is so far and above better than bottling (unbeknownst to most of them). Bottlers tend to keep the beer at room temp so the yeast can stay active and carbonate - (higher temp=longer time till "aged"). If you keg, most likely you keep your beer colder longer to help the co2 stay in solution or because you are using the co2 on your draft system ( in the cold Keezer) to pressurize your kegs.

As I see it... These 3 things are the great truths about shortening how long it takes to get a beer to its greatest potential.

EDIT: these would be the UNTOLD TRUTHS. That is to say, fermentation temps and cellaring procedures as well as proper pitch rate and Oxigenation are all the primary factors, but everybody knows about that and I think there are very few people in our hobby who don't understand this to at least some degree.

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Old 11-11-2013, 04:07 PM   #266
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brewskii
Over the years I have gathered the short turn around of commercial beers is mysteriously aided by a few factors . I have heard; 1) pressurized fermentation - it's harder on the yeast and makes autolysis a real concern, but allegedly pressurized fermentation helps either minimize the production of off-products or, more likely, the speed at which they settle or are re-absorbed 2) filtration - after the yeast are done in the secondary the aging and flavor of a beer are almost exclusively acted upon by settling of off flavor causing compounds. Time will help because they will settle out eventually. In the absence of time if you filter a beer cold you remove a great deal of the fermentation compounds and therefore don't need to age. 3) cold storage/filtration - in terms of haze, the colder you get the beer, the more the micro sized particles (and flavor compounds associated with them) flock together. The bigger the flock the quicker they settle. It's my belief that this is one of the main reasons people who keg believe kegging is so far and above better than bottling (unbeknownst to most of them). Bottlers tend to keep the beer at room temp so the yeast can stay active and carbonate - (higher temp=longer time till "aged"). If you keg, most likely you keep your beer colder longer to help the co2 stay in solution or because you are using the co2 on your draft system ( in the cold Keezer) to pressurize your kegs. As I see it... These 3 things are the great truths about shortening how long it takes to get a beer to its greatest potential. EDIT: these would be the UNTOLD TRUTHS. That is to say, fermentation temps and cellaring procedures as well as proper pitch rate and Oxigenation are all the primary factors, but everybody knows about that and I think there are very few people in our hobby who don't understand this to at least some degree.
And by process of artificial selection they have yeast that are tuned for a specific temp, gravity and other fermenter conditions. They also have the benefit of distribution time to retail.
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Old 06-03-2014, 06:43 AM   #267
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Yuri, I'm thinking he meant a keg that was shaken to expedite carbonation, not one that had priming sugar (dextrose) added to it. I could be wrong.


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Old 06-03-2014, 06:56 AM   #268
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I found this topic very interesting. I just brewed (for the 2nd time), a pale ale (Deschutes Mirror Pond Clone). I brewed it on Friday, it appears to have hit terminal gravity (Monday, I'll check tomorrow). Lots of free English Ale yeast pitched (thanks to Ninkasi Brewing). I will keg it on Friday (dry hop in the keg) and have it ready the following Friday or Saturday for family coming to town. This beer cost me about 25 cents a pint due to being all homegrown Cascade hops, free yeast and grain purchased in built. It was so delicious last spring that I would literally shake my head and just smile that I brewed this beer. Many people at a retirement party I held at our home said the same thing. So, yes, I agree…you can brew a good/great beer and have it very drinkable quickly. I used to bottle and other than low gravity or wheat beers, I found they weren't great until the magical 6-week after bottling mark.


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Old 07-13-2014, 08:18 PM   #269
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should of read this earlier... Just bottled 3 different kind of brew some 4 months aged

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Old 09-29-2014, 12:14 PM   #270
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Great post. Thanks Yuri

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