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Old 11-17-2011, 04:43 PM   #231
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The last couple of batches I have brewed have been more yeasty than normal. I have not changed up my technique much (even though I experiment often - which I do not consider a change since I do this often) I was reading in a different post that water could possibly cause this?
I have been using bottled water until recently and realized this is one of few things I have changed. Is this likely the problem?
Do you most people use tap or bottled water?
If using tap does the process take longer and I am not being patient?

Anyone have any input?

All suggestions and input greatly appreciated.
How long did the beer ferment? Did you use a secondary? What was your fermentation temperature?

If it was warmer, this can promote some yeasty flavors, particularly if a longer primary was used.


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Old 12-21-2011, 07:14 PM   #232
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I would like credit for having read through this entire thread, beginning to end.

Meanwhile, I didn't find discussion about what brought me here to begin with. And that is this: What, exactly, is happening when beer ages?

What are the mechanisms by which flavors change, mellow, combine, etc.? What are the processes underway that make an Old Peculier clone so good after 3 months in the bottle when it tasted like musty vinegar after two weeks in the bottle? Anyone know what's actually going on in there?



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Old 12-21-2011, 08:03 PM   #233
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I would like credit for having read through this entire thread, beginning to end.

Meanwhile, I didn't find discussion about what brought me here to begin with. And that is this: What, exactly, is happening when beer ages?

What are the mechanisms by which flavors change, mellow, combine, etc.? What are the processes underway that make an Old Peculier clone so good after 3 months in the bottle when it tasted like musty vinegar after two weeks in the bottle? Anyone know what's actually going on in there?
Many complex chemical reactions are taking place, and the process isn't fully understood from what I have read. What I've noticed is this: over time, hop bitterness fades and specialty malts dull and blend. When I taste a big beer after two weeks, the elements are competing. For example, with old ale, you might have 70 IBUs fighting with a couple pounds of caramel/chocolate/whatever. After a while, the IBUs decrease and the various ingredients come together in harmony.

I've noticed all my big beers taste better after a few months, except for tripel. Pretty easy to guess why; tripel is all yeast flavor, no specialty malts that need to mellow.
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Old 12-22-2011, 07:33 PM   #234
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Many complex chemical reactions are taking place, and the process isn't fully understood...
I thought this might be the case. The plural of anecdote isn't evidence but in my experience the more complex the recipe the more waiting pays off.
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Old 12-25-2011, 07:48 AM   #235
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Its kinda like how left overs taste better the second day. Fresh, all the flavors are still bright and bold. The molecules in one are stronger than others and, mind you this is a very cude and not scientific jogron correct, "break down" and mix similar to how osmosis works with water leaving and entering the cells. The strong bold flavors take over abd spread out through the rest making them less prominant over time allowing the milder flavor to appear.

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Old 01-25-2012, 01:02 AM   #236
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Hopefully my post won't get lost in this very long running, and interesting, discussion, but here goes...

I agree that very good beers can be brewed in relatively short periods of time, but there is plenty of anecdotal evidence that "big" beers can benefit, at least have interesting changes in character, from aging. (See Papazian and Mosher for more authoritative references).

So, with that in mind... My brewing season is coming to an end (it's time to go sailing) and I am planning brew up an IPA and leave it to condition/age while we are gone (about 6 months). My current version of the recipe (using BrewSmith), has an OG of 1.068, IBU of 55.8, and estimated ABV of 7.0%.

I suppose I could be really historically authentic and put the keg aboard to condition while we're out cruising, but I think I will leave it at home in more controlled conditions (I'm planning to hold the temp at about 60F).

I have not experimented with longer conditioning times before, so I am most interested in observations from those who have -- specific experiences with IPA's would be great.


Thanks,

Curtis

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Old 01-25-2012, 12:31 PM   #237
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So, with that in mind... My brewing season is coming to an end (it's time to go sailing) and I am planning brew up an IPA and leave it to condition/age while we are gone (about 6 months). My current version of the recipe (using BrewSmith), has an OG of 1.068, IBU of 55.8, and estimated ABV of 7.0%.

I have not experimented with longer conditioning times before, so I am most interested in observations from those who have -- specific experiences with IPA's would be great.
IPAs are best consumed fresh. See the label for the famous Pliny the Elder here where they state the same.

If you age an IPA it will allow the hop character to diminish greatly over time. Perhaps while you're away it would be better to age a stout or a brown or a Belgian instead?
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Old 01-25-2012, 01:00 PM   #238
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"IPAs are best consumed fresh."
Somewhat ironic since the historical lore seems to indicate that IPAs were developed for their long term preservation properties.

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Old 01-25-2012, 01:51 PM   #239
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"IPAs are best consumed fresh."
Somewhat ironic since the historical lore seems to indicate that IPAs were developed for their long term preservation properties.
Tastes have changed, as as well there is a recent belief that the classic tale of IPAs being sent to India is at least "probably" not entirely accurate.

I like a fresh IPA, but a hoppy big beer can also improve with aging as long as the hops aren't the focal point. Case in point, a Belgian Golden Strong I brewed which was a 1/2 batch, but I accidentally boiled with the full batch amount of hops. Took a while, but the hops actually mellowed out nicely after 1.5 years.
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Old 01-25-2012, 02:15 PM   #240
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"IPAs are best consumed fresh."
Somewhat ironic since the historical lore seems to indicate that IPAs were developed for their long term preservation properties.
Go ahead and age your IPAs if that's what gives you the best results. My personal experience has been in line with what others have said about the hop character diminishing over time.


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