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Old 12-16-2009, 05:33 PM   #151
wheelerc6
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Originally Posted by SpanishCastleAle View Post
Years ago when I started brewing all I had available was the small Wyeast smack packs (now called the 'Propagator'). I would make a 1 pint starter and that worked fine for every 'typical' ale I did (fine regarding attenuation...not necessarily fine regarding off-flavors). In any case, I thought I was pitching plenty and certainly had no idea it was a fraction of what it should be.

I still need to get the timing down. I was used to having my small 1 pint starters at high krausen when I pitched...but if I pitch the 'correct' amount then that's a 1-1.5 qt. starter in 5 gallons and I hate adding that much 'bad beer' to my fermenter. So I guess I need to start the starters earlier so they can finish and flocc and then I can decant the liquid and only pitch the slurry. Even my cold-pitched lagers krausen within 12-18 hours with just a 1 qt. starter (from an Activator or vial) but per the pitching rate calcs that's like 1/4-1/3 of what it should be.

I drink so little that fast turnaround is the least of my worries. I'm now starting to brew more lagers and funky Belgians just because they take more time (at least this way I can brew without creating a big logjam at the keezer).
I am a little confused by this post. Everything I have read states that a starter is the growing of yeast not the making of beer. The only way to keep the yeast growing is to keep giving it food and oxygen. If the starter goes into krausen than you are making beer not yeast.

Great post Yuri. Just finished reading the entire thread. I too have started skipping moving my beer to secondary. Primary for 2-3 weeks, cold crash than to keg for 7 days. I like to make beers around 1.06 so I am not sure I will be able to get away with not aging for at least 2 weeks. Is it best to age in the keg without carbonation or can I carb than bring back to room temp to age for a short period of time...than back to serving temp?


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Old 01-21-2010, 04:48 PM   #152
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Quote:
I am a little confused by this post. Everything I have read states that a starter is the growing of yeast not the making of beer. The only way to keep the yeast growing is to keep giving it food and oxygen. If the starter goes into krausen than you are making beer not yeast.
You are right that the goal of a starter is to grow yeast and not to make beer. But when we make a starter the yeast grow by making beer. Yeast reproduce well into the fermentation process. When at high krausen the yeast are reproducing as they make beer, we're still growing yeast. I've never had a starter not krausen, even with a stirplate. Hope that clears up what I was saying. That post was a while back and I don't remember the context. Needless to say, I do things quite a bit differently now.


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Old 01-22-2010, 07:29 PM   #153
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Don't think I've ever aged a beer longer than a month and that was unintentional.
I was simply busy and it sat in my kegerator for an extra 2 weeks.

The only beer I absolutly let sit for a month is my Irish Red. It's the only beer I can tell a huge difference in taste by aging.

Other then, that my Pilsners, pale ales and Helles all go from grain to glass in under 3 weeks. They taste great, are clear and keep my friends coming back for more.

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Old 02-04-2010, 12:17 PM   #154
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Thanks for the informative thread. I'm still a pretty green brewer and there's a lot of really good information here.

On the complete opposite end of the spectrum, while reading this I've been drinking one of the last remaining bottles of my spiced Belgian black ale, which is now about two years in the bottle and just keeps on getting better, after starting out a little harsh and unbalanced. But, even I don't want to wait that long most of the time.

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Old 02-07-2010, 02:47 AM   #155
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I haven't read the whole thread, but I thought I'd throw in my $0.02. I brew mainly high gravity beers (1.090 - 1.120). Lately, I've been fermenting in a primary for a week, secondary for a week, and then bottling. The time in the bottle varies for the beer, but I've had one that was ready to go in two weeks.

I'm not sure this is the best method for high grav. I'm planning on comparing this beer to beer that I let sit in a secondary for a month or two.

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Old 02-17-2010, 05:54 PM   #156
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quite reader for a longgg time and this post has lots of useful info for everyone

i already practice most of this but i have one question that wasnt answered, i age my high gravity beers at room temp in kegs after racking from primary with cold crash, i know room temp aging speeds up the process but i also know that temperature changes and swings arent good at any point of the process, so the question, i just started an IPA, 1.07 at about 50 ibu, i plan on dry hopping then cold crashing and kegging, i know this beer will have to age before i will like it, do i cold crash then keg then warm it back up to age, or do i cold crash then keg and put it in the kegerator to age and just wait longer?

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Old 02-19-2010, 06:25 PM   #157
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I spent some time talking to the brewmaster at my favorite local microbrewery.

They can go from grain to glass in 10 days. Their beer is some of the best I have ever had, ales are meant to be enjoyed fresh.

He says they don't believe you can over pitch your yeast. While they have read about it occurring nobody they have ever spoken to has actually ever experienced it. By pitching yeast into half of their wort and adding the second half the next day he says they get complete fermentation in 48 hours. They give the beer a couple days to clear, cold crash, and keg. It's fantastic.

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Old 02-19-2010, 06:28 PM   #158
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qi just started an IPA, 1.07 at about 50 ibu, i plan on dry hopping then cold crashing and kegging, i know this beer will have to age before i will like it,
You ever had a Pliny The Elder? Thats a pretty good IPA and quite a bit bigger than your. It is 3 weeks grain to glass. Just starts getting worse the minute it is separated from the dry hops.
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Old 03-08-2010, 06:21 PM   #159
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Quote:
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By pitching yeast into half of their wort and adding the second half the next day he says they get complete fermentation in 48 hours.
I like this idea a lot. I have a 1 gallon carboy and I'm thinking I could fill 3/4 of the gallon with wort and pitch the yeast and fill my primary with the rest of the wort. I would let the yeast reproduce for a day and then pitch the gallon jug the next day. Thoughts?
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Old 03-08-2010, 07:10 PM   #160
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I like this idea a lot. I have a 1 gallon carboy and I'm thinking I could fill 3/4 of the gallon with wort and pitch the yeast and fill my primary with the rest of the wort. I would let the yeast reproduce for a day and then pitch the gallon jug the next day. Thoughts?
The problem I have with this is the 1/2 of wort that the yeast is not pitched in is a prime target for bad bacteria to grow. The quicker I can get my yeast into my wort the better.


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