The Great Bottle Opener Giveaway

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Techniques > Aging beer: Facts, myths, and discussion

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 10-27-2009, 06:59 PM   #131
RGH
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Baumholder,RP, DE
Posts: 104
Default

Yeah that happened with my first batch. I set it in my garage in the late fall when it got down to the high 30s. I let it sit in there for a few weeks and then I went and cracked one and it was a dud. So I cracked another... dud. SO I got on HBT and asked the same question and they told me the same. On another note... Does anyone ever do a secondary condition in a corny keg? Since moving to and being homebrewless, I have a plan to do 3 five gallon batches in order to get a good pipeline going. I only have 3 carboys, but I do have 5 corny's that are out of commission do to the fact I had to sell the keezer before I moved out here (sob... its hard to talk about... Stupid voltages...). Until I get another keezer and external thermostat like I had before, I was thinking about conditioning some beers in them. Can someone let me know if this is a good idea or a bad idea and why?

__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by staffVAJoe View Post
... If you are smart enough and talented enough to make a better cheese burger than McDonald's then you are good enough to out brew Budweiser.

end of discussion.
RGH is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-29-2009, 04:24 AM   #132
HalfPint
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Houston
Posts: 1,823
Liked 13 Times on 12 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Awesome thread man. I'd have to say that my brews are yet another perfect example of why kegging and starters can help you drink more beer FASTER.

I have an APA that I like a lot. I typically pitch a 1000 ml starter and after about 14 days I rack straight from primary to my keg. I let it cool overnight and hook the gas up to around 12 psi the next morning. In 7 days I have great beer.

One note maybe it's just from my taste buds, I have noticed like others that belgians and hefe's don't work very well with this method. I've found using gelatin or another fining agent + letting sit in the keg for minimum of a month makes them amazing.

__________________
HalfPint is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-29-2009, 12:40 PM   #133
conpewter
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
conpewter's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: East Dundee, Illinois
Posts: 5,106
Liked 40 Times on 35 Posts
Likes Given: 7

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by RGH View Post
Yeah that happened with my first batch. I set it in my garage in the late fall when it got down to the high 30s. I let it sit in there for a few weeks and then I went and cracked one and it was a dud. So I cracked another... dud. SO I got on HBT and asked the same question and they told me the same. On another note... Does anyone ever do a secondary condition in a corny keg? Since moving to and being homebrewless, I have a plan to do 3 five gallon batches in order to get a good pipeline going. I only have 3 carboys, but I do have 5 corny's that are out of commission do to the fact I had to sell the keezer before I moved out here (sob... its hard to talk about... Stupid voltages...). Until I get another keezer and external thermostat like I had before, I was thinking about conditioning some beers in them. Can someone let me know if this is a good idea or a bad idea and why?
I secondary in cornies (when I secondary) sometimes. I normally go straight from primary -> cornie -> fridge and carb. I've even used them as primaries but made sure to use fermcap foam control.
__________________

"People should not be afraid of their governments. Governments should be afraid of their people." - V

Primary: Nothin
Secondary: Shady Lord RIS, Water to Barleywine, Pumpkin wine, burnt mead
Kegged: Crappy infected mild
Bottles: Apfelwein, 999 Barleywine, Oatmeal Stout, Robust Porter, Robust smoked porter, Simcoe Smash

conpewter is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-31-2009, 12:07 AM   #134
Yuri_Rage
Gritty.
HBT_MODERATOR.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Yuri_Rage's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Southwest
Posts: 13,893
Liked 598 Times on 370 Posts
Likes Given: 54

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by HalfPint View Post
One note maybe it's just from my taste buds, I have noticed like others that belgians and hefe's don't work very well with this method. I've found using gelatin or another fining agent + letting sit in the keg for minimum of a month makes them amazing.
Nope. Makes no sense to me. I use no fining agents with hefeweizens (hefe is YEAST!) or wits. I drink those styles FRESH!!!
__________________
Homebrewed Blog..........YouTube Channel .......... Shirts, posters, etc
Yuri_Rage is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-01-2009, 03:29 PM   #135
RandalG
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
RandalG's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: The Windy City
Posts: 453
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts

Default

Very informative thread. I understand the general idea is to show aging is not always necessary but I do have a few questions on aging. I've read some beers should be drank younger such as hefes and wits. I've also read bigger beers benefit from aging up to a year or more. So I was wondering is there a rule of thumb between styles that you can use to tell how long a beer should be aged. Would it be abv or ingredient specific. Is room temp the best way to age beer? And is there such a thing as over aging and what would that depend on style/ingredients or abv.In other words how long before a certain style will go bad? I'm bottling and talking about ales as I'm not set up to keg or lager yet.

__________________

Last edited by RandalG; 11-01-2009 at 03:38 PM.
RandalG is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-01-2009, 04:20 PM   #136
HalfPint
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Houston
Posts: 1,823
Liked 13 Times on 12 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuri_Rage View Post
Nope. Makes no sense to me. I use no fining agents with hefeweizens (hefe is YEAST!) or wits. I drink those styles FRESH!!!
Maybe that's just me. I went through a huge hefe/belgian fase for a while. I probably brewed 20 gallons all in a row of those styles and that was my observation. Maybe I was just burnt out on those styles. I agree that there is really no point to use a fining agent on the belgians or hefe's b/c like you said, a lot of the flavor in those brews are from the yeast strains since they're low fluctuating strains.
__________________

Last edited by HalfPint; 11-01-2009 at 04:22 PM.
HalfPint is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-01-2009, 04:29 PM   #137
mordantly
Registered User
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Westside..... CenCal - the country that'll never take away my guns or money !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Posts: 3,945
Liked 10 Times on 10 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

thats like takin the jelly out of a pb and j sandwich. criminal!

__________________
mordantly is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-01-2009, 04:37 PM   #138
HalfPint
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Houston
Posts: 1,823
Liked 13 Times on 12 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mordantly View Post
thats like takin the jelly out of a pb and j sandwich. criminal!
I don't know. towards the end I really started feeling sick after drinking a couple of pints of that stuff. It's just too much for me. I used to love em, but I think I burnt myself out.
__________________
HalfPint is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-01-2009, 05:54 PM   #139
mordantly
Registered User
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Westside..... CenCal - the country that'll never take away my guns or money !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Posts: 3,945
Liked 10 Times on 10 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

yeah i hear you. i got some widmers hefe at pizza port a year back that was unusually clouded with yeast. i light checked it and thought "hmm.. swamp water" it had too much yeast flavor so i didnt have any more pints till that keg was gone. what i meant was non-excessive levels are required for the style.

__________________
mordantly is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-01-2009, 07:15 PM   #140
HalfPint
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Houston
Posts: 1,823
Liked 13 Times on 12 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mordantly View Post
yeah i hear you. i got some widmers hefe at pizza port a year back that was unusually clouded with yeast. i light checked it and thought "hmm.. swamp water" it had too much yeast flavor so i didnt have any more pints till that keg was gone. what i meant was non-excessive levels are required for the style.
Yeah, that's what defines them. The yeasty flavor is in fact what is so good about them when it's in an appropriate level. Also, another thing I found about the belgians is that those yeasts produce a lot of sulfur flavor if they're not aged for long enough.
__________________
HalfPint is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Drink up! 12 Most common beer myths exploded wildwest450 General Chit Chat 39 09-13-2012 07:41 PM
CommerICal beer discussion? Ketchepillar Commercial Brew Discussion 0 06-01-2009 10:54 PM
Interesting beer facts... par383 General Beer Discussion 2 10-11-2008 03:07 AM