Spike Brewing 12.5 Conical Fermenter Giveaway!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Techniques > adding dark grains at vorlauf

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 06-01-2012, 11:18 AM   #21
Calichusetts
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Calichusetts's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Plymouth, MA
Posts: 2,345
Liked 224 Times on 165 Posts
Likes Given: 602

Default

I'm pretty sure I remember reading about this in Radical Brewing...its a great way to get the color you want without the negative affects the malt can cause the taste

__________________
Calichusetts is online now
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-01-2012, 01:34 PM   #22
Stauffbier
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
Stauffbier's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: El Paso, TX
Posts: 5,061
Liked 1003 Times on 617 Posts
Likes Given: 2673

Default

I wonder if you could get the best of both worlds by adding the dark grains to the last 10 or 15 mins of the mash?!..

__________________
Stauffbier is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-03-2012, 12:11 AM   #23
Brew-boy
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Brew-boy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Lapeer, Michigan
Posts: 2,415
Liked 13 Times on 10 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default

Some people do it to get the dark color without the roast flavor.

__________________
Next:Smoked Pilsner.
Primary:Belgian Red, American Stout w/Roeselare
On Tap:Pale Ale, English Bitter
Aging: Imperial Oatmeal Stout on Vanilla beans.

I rather owe you a dollar than cheat you out of it.."Dad"

http://lapeerareabrewers.com/

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/LapeerAreaBrewers/
Brew-boy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-03-2012, 03:24 AM   #24
GarageBeerGarden
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Lemoore, California
Posts: 12
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

You still get the roast flavor, though albeit not as intense, but as one poster commented earlier, the idea is to avoid extracting the tannins and harsher flavors you get with prolonged exposure. When you dunk a tea bag into hot water, it still tastes like tea even if you remove it after only a short time, right? Yes it's weaker, but it won't be bitter and astringent like it is if you leave the bag in the whole time. The same concept applies here too.

__________________
GarageBeerGarden is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-03-2012, 01:54 PM   #25
bumstigedy
Member
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
bumstigedy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Fairfax, Virginia
Posts: 290
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts

Default

So if you are batch sparging, when do you add the dark grains?

Last weekend I brewed an American brown ale and added the chocolate malt and crystal 120 with 15 min left in the mash. This exposed the dark grains to hot water for about 30 min after doing a mash out and batch sparging.

Went with distiller water with minimal salt additions for the mash since I didn't have the dark grains to worry about.

__________________
bumstigedy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-03-2012, 02:00 PM   #26
pcollins
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Cambridge, ON
Posts: 547
Liked 26 Times on 24 Posts
Likes Given: 36

Default

It shouldn't matter if you're batch sparging, fly sparging or any combination therein. You can add the grains at the end of the mash before vorlauf.

__________________
pcollins is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-03-2012, 03:50 PM   #27
barrooze
Feedback Score: 6 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Pearland, TX
Posts: 2,272
Liked 100 Times on 84 Posts
Likes Given: 129

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bumstigedy
So if you are batch sparging, when do you add the dark grains?

Last weekend I brewed an American brown ale and added the chocolate malt and crystal 120 with 15 min left in the mash. This exposed the dark grains to hot water for about 30 min after doing a mash out and batch sparging.

Went with distiller water with minimal salt additions for the mash since I didn't have the dark grains to worry about.
I'd love to hear how this turned out for you. Did you stir the mash after adding the dark grains? I've been toying with this method as well, but wasn't sure how well it'd do with batch sparging (which I do). I think doing a mash out with this method is a really good idea too.
__________________
Kegged: Flanders Blonde, Saison (WLP585), Saison (Belle Saison), Mid-ABV Janet's Brown, Texas Brown Ale (A.K.A. The Creature) Primary: Nothing Souring: Oaked Brett Blended Saison On Deck: Oktoberfest (ECY15) On the Horizon: Epic Pale ale clone, Tonguesplitter Updated: 2014/05/05
Untappd: barrooze
barrooze is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-03-2012, 04:33 PM   #28
BBL_Brewer
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
BBL_Brewer's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Kokomo, IN
Posts: 3,695
Liked 418 Times on 292 Posts
Likes Given: 309

Default

When I make stouts, I don't add dark grains to the mash at all. Instead, I steep them in the wort after I combine all the runnings in the BK. Makes a much smoother tasting beer. I imagine you would get similar results adding them to the mash right before lauter, in fact I've been meaning to try it that way, would cut some time off brewday. The first stout I made I mashed everything and it came out with a very harsh bitterness. And if you're not getting the roastiness you want using this method, use more grain.

__________________
Slots Down Brewery
Stick with the plan....not the sparge.


Never Ending Liquid Yeast - How to Farm Yeast and Freeze it.

BBL_Brewer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-03-2012, 08:09 PM   #29
ResumeMan
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
ResumeMan's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Oakland, CA
Posts: 460
Liked 24 Times on 23 Posts

Default

I recently did this for an American stout. The main reason was to avoid pushing my mash pH too low, as I have very low alkalinity water.

I mixed in the roast grains after about 45 minutes, and let it sit for maybe 10 before starting the vorlauf. It took a good couple of quarts of vorlauf before the wort I drew from the bottom turned from brown to black, but it did.

Still in the fermenter. I tasted a hydrometer sample. It definitely had a roasty flavor, though that one sample seemed less-so than expected from all the dark grains. But I'll wait to reserve judgment till it's in the keg and carbed. If I remember I'll report back.

__________________
ResumeMan is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-03-2012, 09:04 PM   #30
bumstigedy
Member
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
bumstigedy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Fairfax, Virginia
Posts: 290
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts

Default

I recirculate the mash because it is direct fired. After i collected first runnings, I added sparge water and stirred for several minutes.

I'll let you know how it turned out in a few weeks. I have another one brewed the normal way and will bottle some so I can try side by side.

__________________
bumstigedy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Cold steep dark grains? robertjohnson General Techniques 58 12-10-2012 01:38 AM
Using pump to vorlauf.. couple questions riored4v General Techniques 5 04-01-2012 05:48 PM
Thoughts on Dark Grains in the Mash GroovePuppy General Techniques 12 12-18-2009 04:57 PM
Vorlauf question - runnings won't clear? Tankard General Techniques 11 06-24-2008 01:18 AM
Adding Adjunct Grains NUCC98 General Techniques 1 01-18-2005 03:21 PM