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Old 02-19-2012, 01:12 PM   #21
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I believe that Yoopers ideas are correct. I have found that later additions add more to flavor and aroma. Dry hopping is the key to percieved bitterness.

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Old 02-19-2012, 01:17 PM   #22
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I've brewed IPAs both ways (60-15-5-KO-DH vs. 60-big KO-big DH) and have been happy both ways. I couldn't really say which way was better or how they were different given how dissimilar the recipes were, but I think I may just do side-by-side half batches of an IPA hopped in the following ways (same grain bill, equal amount of hops between recipes) to compare. I won't be brewing them any time soon though, but they are on the ledger for brewing in March.

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Old 02-19-2012, 07:40 PM   #23
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a lot of breweries use 30minute additions, especially some of the really hoppy beers. Verus homebrewing, you rarely see a 30minute addition unless its a clone where the brewer said they do a 30minute addition

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Old 02-19-2012, 09:03 PM   #24
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Check out a hop utilization chart to see how the different additions are, ummm, different.
I assume it provides complexity.
One could use staggered additions for any brew where flavor and aroma additions are appropriate, but I suspect more trouble than it is worth in many cases where the additions become very small. Interesting idea though.

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Old 02-19-2012, 09:46 PM   #25
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where did you get that chart?

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Old 02-19-2012, 10:32 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJstout View Post
where did you get that chart?
Not sure where it is from originally. This is one of a few hosted on HBT. Google "hop utilization chart".
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Old 07-17-2012, 07:57 PM   #27
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Bringing this thread back to life to farther my own hop theory.
I think cohumulone plays a role in the perception of flavor in long-boil hops, thus chinook for example, will have more perceived flavor/bitterness at the 60ish minute mark. I feel cohumulone becomes aggressive when it is over 27% (personal taste) I feel there is a balance required for cohumulone to abv. The bigger the beer the more forgivable the cohumulone percentage, FG of course plays a role in this balance as well. I feel if a high cohumulone hop is used a bigger hop addition later in the boil is appropriate (45minute addition of 1.25oz instead of 1oz at 60)
I have found most of the perceived bitterness comes from dry hops.
My last brew was a pliney clone and I steeped low (125f for 20minutes) I definitely notice a difference (in a pleasant way)

I think I will start only using 60/90 minute additions then holding off on the other additions until the 15 minute mark for my IPA's. Due to the diminishing returns of hops, I feel this would be the most efficient way to effectively isomerize the essential oils in the late additions. This should produce a cleaner beer with lower cohumulone percentages. For beers where hop aroma and flavor are inappropriate I will continue my 45 and 30 minute additions to increase cohumulone thus perceived bitterness to acceptable levels.

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Old 07-20-2012, 02:48 PM   #28
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I was always under the impression that boiling the hops for upwards of 90 minutes can lead to a much more harsh bitterness. I have never tried for myself because of this and also considering the minimal increase in IBU from doing so. It doesn't seem worth the risk to me.

Just a thought.

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Old 07-20-2012, 03:05 PM   #29
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I very rarely do anything more than 60 minute additions, 10 to 5 minute additions, and dry hops. I don't see the need for any other additions no matter what the style is I'm brewing.

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Old 07-20-2012, 03:28 PM   #30
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Speaking from my culinary experience with fresh herbs in soups and aromatic broths, it makes sense to skip 59-1 minute hop additions and focus on a substantial warm aroma steep and dryhop in order to get the best aroma. We learn as chefs that boiling delicate herbs destroy the volatile oils so you want to add them last minute. I have yet to brew an IPA with this same mindset, but I would like to compare and contrast the results with separate dual boils of otherwise the same recipe.

It's not completely absurd that a 60 minute addition and late additions will not work. Elysian Brewing co. follows a 60, 2, DH schedule for a few of their IPA's and that seems to work quite well. I believe the boys over at Alchemist even skip the traditional bittering addition and focus all their hops at 15 mins and later.

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