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Old 10-28-2004, 12:12 PM   #1
UdderJuice
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Default 23 hours and nothing has happened...

So TUesday night I made my first batch of beer with the Mr Beer kit. It was 24 hours at 11:00 last night (about 9 hours ago) so a total of 33 hours and when I looked at the fermentation vessle this morning it was as calm as can be, no bubbles no foam and all the yeast just sitting on the bottom.

What the hell? I followed their instructions exactly.

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Old 10-28-2004, 05:44 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by UdderJuice
So TUesday night I made my first batch of beer with the Mr Beer kit. It was 24 hours at 11:00 last night (about 9 hours ago) so a total of 33 hours and when I looked at the fermentation vessle this morning it was as calm as can be, no bubbles no foam and all the yeast just sitting on the bottom.

What the hell? I followed their instructions exactly.
I had a similar experience with my first Mr. Beer batch. I made the West Coast Pale Ale, and I can only conclude that the fermentation finished very quickly in the first night. I left in the fermenter for a week anyways and it turned out fine. If you made the West Coast Pale, take a small sample...should taste like a light American beer with a slight cidery taste if you used the Booster. I am glad to see another Mr. Beer user on here. I have made four batches with that kit thus far and couldn't be happier. Their included yeast works really fast from my experience. I have also been using the Superior lager yeast they offer in my last two batches with great results.
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Old 10-28-2004, 05:54 PM   #3
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Ahhh thank goodness there is another Mr Beer user here.

I'm concerned because I have read a lot about the process and Mr Beer seems to be not following all the things I have read. I pitched my yeast Tuesday night at 11:00 PM and when I checked it the next morning the fermenter was completely calm. There has never been any visible activity that I can see and no foam on the surface of the liquid at all. From what I have read proper fermentation creates a thick head of foam on the top.

Its now been about 40 hours total and the yeast sludge is just sitting there on the bottom and there is no foam at all on the surface of the liquid.

Perhaps their beer mixes and yeast work differently from regular brew from scratch kits. Have all your brews fermented the same way? i.e. no bubbling and foam?

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Old 10-28-2004, 06:05 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by UdderJuice
Ahhh thank goodness there is another Mr Beer user here.

I'm concerned because I have read a lot about the process and Mr Beer seems to be not following all the things I have read. I pitched my yeast Tuesday night at 11:00 PM and when I checked it the next morning the fermenter was completely calm. There has never been any visable activity that I can see and no foam on the surface of the liquid at all. From what I have read proper fermentation creates a thick head of foam on the top.

Its now been about 40 hours total and the yeast sludge is just sitting there on the bottom and there is no foam at all on the surface of the liquid.

Perhaps their beer mixes and yeast work differently from regular brew from scratch kits. Have all your brews fermented the same way? i.e. no bubbling and foam?

Only the West Coast Pale Ale worked like that for me. I would taste test it...I saw the exact same thing. It might already be done-mine did the exact same thing as yours. My other Mr. Beer creations have had more standard fermentation cycles with a lot of krausen (foam). You can always give it a little shake. What is the temperature of the keg? I put a cup of water with a thermometer in it next to mine to gauge the most likely temperature in the keg.
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Old 10-28-2004, 06:09 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by sweepking
Only the West Coast Pale Ale worked like that for me. I would taste test it...I saw the exact same thing. It might already be done-mine did the exact same thing as yours. My other Mr. Beer creations have had more standard fermentation cycles with a lot of krausen (foam). You can always give it a little shake. What is the temperature of the keg? I put a cup of water with a thermometer in it next to mine to gauge the most likely temperature in the keg.
I'm not sure but the room temp in my apt is 74-75.

I'm just trying to figure out if I should waste more time with this batch or not. Its possible that because its a pale ale it doesn't ferment as vigorously.

But you are saying that a taste test at this point should taste like beer just without the carbination? If it tastes funky then its no good?

I have a can of the Englishman's Nut Brown Ale to try after the Pale Ale.
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Old 10-28-2004, 06:16 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by UdderJuice
I'm not sure but the room temp in my apt is 74-75.

I'm just trying to figure out if I should waste more time with this batch or not. Its possible that because its a pale ale it doesn't ferment as vigorously.

But you are saying that a taste test at this point should taste like beer just without the carbination? If it tastes funky then its no good?

I have a can of the Englishman's Nut Brown Ale to try after the Pale Ale.

Yeah, your taste test should taste like flat Coors or similar with a slight cidery taste due to the Booster. If you have good sanitation, it won't taste funky...just very sweet. There is a very slight chance that your yeast is dead if you can't get it to work with a little shaking or re-stirring with a sterile spoon to aerate. I have never had bad yeast from Mr. Beer. If it is, just get some more yeast. I believe I used the nut brown ale in my Octoberfest recipe...turned out great. Mr. Beer is great, just get away from using the Booster as the second ingredient...do their All Malt stuff and only use Booster when called for in a special recipe such as the Scottish Wee Heavy or others where it is used to add to the alcohol content and has a good amount of malt to balance it.
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Old 10-28-2004, 06:32 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by sweepking
Yeah, your taste test should taste like flat Coors or similar with a slight cidery taste due to the Booster. If you have good sanitation, it won't taste funky...just very sweet. There is a very slight chance that your yeast is dead if you can't get it to work with a little shaking or re-stirring with a sterile spoon to aerate. I have never had bad yeast from Mr. Beer. If it is, just get some more yeast. I believe I used the nut brown ale in my Octoberfest recipe...turned out great. Mr. Beer is great, just get away from using the Booster as the second ingredient...do their All Malt stuff and only use Booster when called for in a special recipe such as the Scottish Wee Heavy or others where it is used to add to the alcohol content and has a good amount of malt to balance it.
Yeah my first can of Nut Brown I got with a pack of booster and then I was going to make a batch with the unhopped malt just to compare.

I guess when I get home tonight I'll take a little sip. It just seems to my untrained eye that nothing has happened at all. It hasn't even been two full days yet but everything says that it should start foaming in 12 hours.

Do you bottle after a week? I also read that an additional week of fermenting makes for more flavorfull beer.

Also do you just pitch the dry yeast or do you make a started by adding it to water?
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Old 10-28-2004, 06:40 PM   #8
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Yeah my first can of Nut Brown I got with a pack of booster and then I was going to make a batch with the unhopped malt just to compare.

I guess when I get home tonight I'll take a little sip. It just seems to my untrained eye that nothing has happened at all. It hasn't even been two full days yet but everything says that it should start foaming in 12 hours.

Do you bottle after a week? I also read that an additional week of fermenting makes for more flavorfull beer.

Also do you just pitch the dry yeast or do you make a started by adding it to water?
With the Pale Ale, I would bottle after a week and then carbonate for a week. I just don't see that you would get a huge benefit out of aging that beer...not a whole lot of ingredients in it. Plus, I think that getting a decent beer after waiting two weeks will help build your confidence in this hobby. It will also free up your fermenter quicker to do the all malt batch.

I never make starters with dry yeast. I did once with the Superior lager yeast and it caused more problems than it was worth. The next time, I dry pitched it, and it worked better. That is one of the advantages to using dry yeast...simplicity. Just make sure you give it five minutes on the surface as directed and then stir it in vigorously to get really good aeration. Another tip is to vigorously stir the cold water you have in your fermenter initially...cold water takes on oxygen easier. I tried that with my last batch, and even at 55 degrees with lager yeast, I had an incredible fermentation going in about 5 hours!
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Old 10-28-2004, 06:44 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by sweepking
With the Pale Ale, I would bottle after a week and then carbonate for a week. I just don't see that you would get a huge benefit out of aging that beer...not a whole lot of ingredients in it. Plus, I think that getting a decent beer after waiting two weeks will help build your confidence in this hobby. It will also free up your fermenter quicker to do the all malt batch.

I never make starters with dry yeast. I did once with the Superior lager yeast and it caused more problems than it was worth. The next time, I dry pitched it, and it worked better. That is one of the advantages to using dry yeast...simplicity. Just make sure you give it five minutes on the surface as directed and then stir it in vigorously to get really good aeration. Another tip is to vigorously stir the cold water you have in your fermenter initially...cold water takes on oxygen easier. I tried that with my last batch, and even at 55 degrees with lager yeast, I had an incredible fermentation going in about 5 hours!
Thanks for all your tips. One last question then I really have to get back to work!

When I pitched my yeast I had just stirred the wort and it had lots of bubbles on the surface, so the yeast just sort of sat on the bubbles for the five minutes and then I stirred it all up again. Do you think this could have made a difference since they weren't really sitting in the liquid? I figured the poping and fizzing from the bubbles was good for activiating the yeast...
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Old 10-28-2004, 06:47 PM   #10
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Thanks for all your tips. One last question then I really have to get back to work!

When I pitched my yeast I had just stirred the wort and it had lots of bubbles on the surface, so the yeast just sort of sat on the bubbles for the five minutes and then I stirred it all up again. Do you think this could have made a difference since they weren't really sitting in the liquid? I figured the poping and fizzing from the bubbles was good for activiating the yeast...
That should not have made a difference...I often have a lot of bubbles due to the aeration as you pour the wort into the fermentor. I will be interested to hear how your taste test goes...I would bet that your fermentation just went very quickly. Your temp is fine and it sounds like your aeration was good too. You may notice some additional slight bubbling in the fermenter over the next few days too.
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