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Old 01-25-2008, 05:30 PM   #1
hal simmons
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Default 2 Gallon Recipe VS Full 5 Gallon Boil

So...if i've got an extract/specialty grain recipe that calls for boiling 2 gallons of wort and then topping off to 5 gallons, but I've got a 15 gallon brew pot (converted keg), can I just steep the grains as usual, and then start the boil at 6.5 gallons (or so, to account for evaporation) so that I end of up with a little over 5 gallons at the end of the boil?

Do I need to adjust the recipe if I'm doing a full boil VS 2 gallon boil and topping off?

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Old 01-25-2008, 05:36 PM   #2
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You don't have to adjust the extract or specialty grains. These are set for the total 5 gallon recipe. Boiling the 2 gallons and then topping up to 5 could net you about the same gravity as if you boiled the 6.5 down to 5 but it really depends on the total volue of water that you are going to use overall (for the 2 gallon boil, are you starting with 2 gallons?).

You do have to adjust the hopping rates. Lower gravity boils (boiling 6.5 gallons of wort) will increase the hop utilization rate making a hoppier beer. The hops and their schedule in the recipe are set at the 2 gallon boil gravity.

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Old 01-25-2008, 11:23 PM   #3
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like Mulcahey said, you could do that, but why waste the time, water and the energy boiling all that water? also, if it's a lighter beer than you'd be better off not boiling so long to keep the color light.

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Old 01-25-2008, 11:50 PM   #4
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I would do a full boil if you have the equipemnt, you can use 25%-50% less hops and you will also get rid of most if not all of the extract twang. Water is alot cheaper than hops & I think you end up with a better brew to boot.

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Old 01-26-2008, 12:34 AM   #5
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how and why would it get rid of the extract twang with a larger boil?

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Old 01-26-2008, 12:45 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DeathBrewer
how and why would it get rid of the extract twang with a larger boil?
For the same reason as late extract additions do. I have read this in many places and heard it on Jamil's show and others many times in the past.

http://www.maltosefalcons.com/tech/Extract_Beers.pdf

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/search.php?searchid=1062764

I dont want to link to other forums so just google extract twang and full boil
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Old 01-26-2008, 01:09 AM   #7
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thanks...i'll check that out later. not brewing much extract lately, but i'm sure i'll do some in the future.

i just figured with a smaller boil you would get a better rolling boil (assuming he's in his kitchen or something) and it would boil off more off flavors.

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Old 01-26-2008, 02:42 PM   #8
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I'm brewing in a converted keg (15 gal) and i've got a propane burner, so It's very easy to achieve a good rolling boil outside. I was planning on steeping 2 gallons in the kitchen with the specialty grains, then dumping that into my brewpot with another 4-5 gallons, adding malt, etc..and doing a full boil.

Am I wasting my time and propane by doing a full boil vs 2 gallons and topping of? I was under the assumption that i'd get a better beer this way.

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Old 01-26-2008, 02:58 PM   #9
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Heck, no, you're not wasting time and energy! It'll be a better beer. You'll have less carmelization of the wort, and less darkening. You'll have to reduce the hops some, though, so if you have some brewing software (Beersmith has a free trial) you can easily know how much to reduce. Or post the recipe here, and one of us can run it through our software for you.

Remember, you have to be able to cool that much wort, though. You really should have a wort chiller if you're boiling 5 gallons. You want to get the wort to pitching temperature in 20 minutes or so if you can.

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Old 01-26-2008, 03:11 PM   #10
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One thing to consider is whether or not you can effectively cool your five gallons of hot wort. Topping a smaller batch off to five gallons with cold water is a very effective way to bring the temperature down so you can pitch the yeast. Or if you have an immersion or counterflow chiller, go for the bigger boil size.

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