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Old 09-10-2012, 01:34 AM   #41
mabrungard
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Looks like a good starting point for almost any brewing. The alkalinity might need to be increased for some beers, but otherwise the alkalinity is quite managable via acidification. I find that bringing my sulfate level to around 300 ppm aids in enhancing a dry finish for my PA's and IPA's. Your taste preference would have to be refined through your own brewing and tasting experience.

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Old 09-10-2012, 11:11 AM   #42
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Take your numbers and plug them in here: http://www.brewersfriend.com/water-chemistry/

Then see if you can get your local water into one of the sweet spots for the style of beer you are brewing. I live on the gulf coast with lots of residual alkalinity in the ground water. I gave up and moved to distilled water. I simply add in the minerals using epsom salts, salt, gypsum, calcium carbonate and bicarbonate. This tool lets you pick water chemistry from a world reknown brewing location and "make" it yourself. Sometimes you just cannot get around bad water.

Yours looks pretty good. I ran the numbers in the tool and for 5 gallons found that 3 grams or 0.74 teaspoon of gypsum (Calcium sulphate) puts you in the sweet spot for highly bitter pales. Estimated pH of 5.79 and alkalinity of -5.44. An addition of 2 grams of calcium chloride (.59 teaspoon) will drop it from highly bitter to just bitter, lessening the accentuation of the hop bitterness. Or alternatively, you can add 2 grams of deionized table salt, I use sea salt, to raise the CL content to hit the same range as using the calcium chloride. The salt increases the apparent mouth feel, or fullness of the beer on the tongue. the NaCl disassociates more readily in solution so you are likely to get more real use out of it than the calcuim chloride in solution.

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Old 09-10-2012, 12:31 PM   #43
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Not sure if this will help but i found a page of water recipes for particular styles which are based off using distilled water. go to the bottom of the page
http://hbd.org/brewery/library/wchmprimer.html

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Old 09-10-2012, 08:17 PM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KPatton View Post
Take your numbers and plug them in here: http://www.brewersfriend.com/water-chemistry/

Then see if you can get your local water into one of the sweet spots for the style of beer you are brewing.
Be very careful with that recommendation. The water's from those 'sweet spots' may not be all that sweet if the brewer doesn't know how to adjust and correct that 'sweet' water the way the old brewers of that area did. Don't assume that historic water profiles make better beer. I suggest that reading a bit more on the Water Knowledge page of the Bru'n Water website would be a way to understand why those water profiles may not be ideal for your brewing.
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Old 09-11-2012, 12:02 AM   #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KPatton View Post
the NaCl disassociates more readily in solution so you are likely to get more real use out of it than the calcuim chloride in solution.
Not so. Both are completely dissociated. Sodium chloride is much more soluble that calcium chloride but you will not approach the solubility limits of either. Thus calcium chloride is every bit as effective as sodium chloride in terms of getting chloride into solution and has the added benefit of getting more calcium into the beer. Additional sodium is at best a 'don't care' and at worst a flavor spoiler (unless you want something like a Gose in which case have at it).
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Old 09-13-2012, 12:19 AM   #46
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Thanks!! For the Replys

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