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Old 10-11-2013, 09:59 PM   #11
J0N
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How about citric acid?

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Old 10-11-2013, 10:20 PM   #12
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Those who remember the old, old days of home brewing will remember that a tsp full of citric acid was found in many of the recipes published then. You never see it mentioned today and I always assumed that the reason was the flavor. But then we now load our beers with Citra hops so perhaps it's time to revisit citric acid in brewing. For one thing it has a pK (4.77) close enough to mash pH that one might think of a citrate buffer which would be more effective at holding mash pH than the phosphate buffer in the 5-star product. I'm guessing that flavor is the killer with citrate.

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Old 10-12-2013, 12:01 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by J0N View Post
To summarize, I should do the following:

- Remove chlorine (always)

- Add hardness (calcium: ie gypsum)
- Remove excess alkalinity

The amount of calcium I need to add and alkalinity that needs to be removed is based upon the type of beer I'm making.

Also, I'm not comfortable adding phosphoric or lactic acid. If this is used to acidify the brewing water, can I add something like lemon or white vinegar?
If you're worried about using the acids out of fear of handling them, rest assured. You're not in danger of harming yourself (I wouldn't pour it in your eyes, though).
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Old 10-12-2013, 11:37 AM   #14
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I don't like consuming synthetic or animal products, but I read the following concerning lactic acid, which I will need to confirm with the products manufacturer prior to purchasing.

"If it’s lactate or lactic acid, it’s not from dairy (exception – sterol lactate due to the stearic acid). “Lac” ingredients are usually produced by a fermentation process using cornstarch or beet sugar. Lactose is always from dairy."

If that's the case, I would use it.

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Old 10-12-2013, 11:56 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by J0N View Post
I don't like consuming synthetic or animal products, but I read the following concerning lactic acid, which I will need to confirm with the products manufacturer prior to purchasing.

"If it’s lactate or lactic acid, it’s not from dairy (exception – sterol lactate due to the stearic acid). “Lac” ingredients are usually produced by a fermentation process using cornstarch or beet sugar. Lactose is always from dairy."

If that's the case, I would use it.
As far as I know, all lactic acid used in foods these days is produced using lactobacillus (a bacteria), as your quote states. That'd be the fermentation process they mention with corn starch/beet sugar. Traditionally with pilsners, for example, brewers would do an acid rest at 95 degrees to allow the lacto bacteria on the malt to grow and produce acid, lowering the mash pH before starch conversion happens. It's much more reliable to use liquid acid though.
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Old 10-12-2013, 12:19 PM   #16
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How odd. My last post was done from my iPad, which seems to have not pasted in the text properly. Here it is, corrected.

"If it’s lactate or lactic acid, it’s not from dairy (exception – sterol lactate due to the stearic acid). “Lac” ingredients are usually produced by a fermentation process using cornstarch or beet sugar. Lactose is always from dairy."

Anyway, thank you for the clarification (and brief history lesson). You guys are a wealth of knowledge. It's greatly appreciated.

I also contacted LD Carlson earlier to ask them about their lactic acid. Thanks again!

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Old 10-12-2013, 12:38 PM   #17
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Also, if I boiled over 6 gallons or wort (for a 5 gallon batch) and did not top off with tap water, would that remove the chlorine or does the water need to be boiled prior to mashing?

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Old 10-12-2013, 02:15 PM   #18
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Quote:
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Also, if I boiled over 6 gallons or wort (for a 5 gallon batch) and did not top off with tap water, would that remove the chlorine or does the water need to be boiled prior to mashing?
It is better practice to remove chlorine or chloramines before the mash process. 1/4 to 1/2 of a campden tablet, crushed and stirred well into the brewing water will remove the chlorine. You can do this the night before... others have luck right before the brew day.

Look in the sticky section for how to apply campden.
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Old 10-12-2013, 03:19 PM   #19
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Will do. I have also read a few different responses in regards to boiling water to remove chlorine. I read it needs to be boiled for 3 min, 15 min, and 20 min. I am not sure which is accurate.

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Old 10-12-2013, 04:18 PM   #20
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I believe that boiling time will be sensitive to the batch size, and exposure to surface area of the boil kettle... creating nucleation sites. This also has a potential impact of de-carbonating the water, precipitating bicarbonates and calcium and lowering alkalinity which will require modification to your salt additions.

Campden is extremely easy, effective and does not use fuel to heat a mass of water, nor does it dramatically modify ion concentrations (as far as I know ).

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