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Old 08-29-2012, 01:13 PM   #1
SMc0724
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Default Too much additives

Brewed a double ipa last night with distilled water, 2# BIAB, 7# extract safale 04. Just realized I added the full 1.5 oz vial of Wyeast Yeast Nutrient instead of 1/2 tsp. and added 2 tblsps of Burton Salts. What have I done to the brew?

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Old 08-29-2012, 02:10 PM   #2
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Don't know. The nutrients are usually DAP, urea, yeast hulls and zinc sulfate or some or all of the above. I can't see the urea or yeast hulls hurting anything but I don't know what the DAP or zinc might do in excess. If it ferments I guess you can conclude that you didn't kill the yeast. If it contains zinc I'd want to know how much to be sure that the beer doesn't contain more than is recommended for human consumption.

As to the Burton salts what they do to the beer will depend on what is in the water you started with. For 5 gal of RO or other low ion water 1 tsp would be more suitable. As you are at least 6 times over this I'd expect the beer to be pretty minerally.

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Old 08-29-2012, 02:55 PM   #3
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Thanks. Wyeast does not post the specific contents of this product. I sent them an email.

For Burton Salts, some say to use 1 tsp per gallon, others 1/2 tsp per gallon. I'm over the hig side, but I think I'm ok there.

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Old 08-29-2012, 03:33 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SMc0724 View Post

For Burton Salts, some say to use 1 tsp per gallon, others 1/2 tsp per gallon. I'm over the hig side, but I think I'm ok there.
Those amounts would produce what Gordon Strong would refer to as 'AlkaSelzer beers'.
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Old 08-29-2012, 04:41 PM   #5
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Here is the response that i got from Wyeast: At that dosage rate, assuming all of the nutrients carry over into the finished product (which is not likely), I would have some concerns about some of the nutrient levels. I like to error on the safe side though and would recommend it you do drink the beer that you keep it to about 1 liter/day.

Wyeast Laboratories, Inc.

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Old 08-29-2012, 05:18 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SMc0724 View Post
added 2 tblsps of Burton Salts. What have I done to the brew?
You added around 25 grams of salts to the beer. Looking at Burton's mineral content, I can only guess that the salts are mostly gypsum and epsom. I can't find any reference to what amt of each they contain, but to make Burton water, you need around 2X as much gypsum as epsom.

Awhile back, before I knew anything about water mods, I brewed an IPA and added 22.5 grams of salts to a 7 gallon batch. After it finished fermenting I tasted it and it tasted like alka-seltzer and salt. I tasted every week or so with no change and at one point, I had the fermenter at the edge of the sink about to open the spigot.

I decided not to and bottled the beer. It's been about 2 years and nothing has changed. Every now and then I'll grab one, check it and either drink it or dump it depending on my tastebuds at the given moment. Still tastes like salt and alka-seltzer though.

TLDR: Taste this batch after it finishes fermenting and had dropped clear. Probably ~ 2 weeks. If it tastes bad, check it in another week. If it isn't improving within 4 weeks then make a decision at that point. "Is this beer something that I care to suffer thru?" If the answer is "No" then sit it on the edge of the sink and open that spigot--I wish I had.
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Old 08-30-2012, 12:10 AM   #7
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From http://www.brewerslair.com/index.php...&id=&v=&term=1

Vital Statistics about Burton-on-Trent water profile:
Calcium (ppm):294
Sulfates (ppm): 800
Magnesium (ppm):24
Sodium (ppm):24
Chloride (ppm):36
Carbonates (ppm):200

I figure I added about 20 gms of salt.
This site http://morebeer.com/view_product/595...er_Salts_-_2oz
says:
30g per 5 gallons will provide:
266 ppm Ca
63 ppm Mg
159 ppm Carbonate
631 ppm Sulfate

I think I'm ok with it? Am I wrong?

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Old 08-30-2012, 12:40 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SMc0724 View Post
From http://www.brewerslair.com/index.php...&id=&v=&term=1

Vital Statistics about Burton-on-Trent water profile:
Calcium (ppm):294
Sulfates (ppm): 800
Magnesium (ppm):24
Sodium (ppm):24
Chloride (ppm):36
Carbonates (ppm):200

I figure I added about 20 gms of salt.
This site http://morebeer.com/view_product/595...er_Salts_-_2oz
says:
30g per 5 gallons will provide:
266 ppm Ca
63 ppm Mg
159 ppm Carbonate
631 ppm Sulfate

I think I'm ok with it? Am I wrong?
That's a bunch of everything. Your tastebuds and bowels will tell you how OK it is. Excessive Mg and SO4 can have a laxative effect

Here's some stuff on how ions affect beer. http://www.howtobrew.com/section3/chapter15-1.html
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Old 08-30-2012, 12:56 AM   #9
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It really isn't a question of being right or wrong. It's a question of whether you like the beer. You have three people, me, Gordon Strong and RCCOLA opinining that the beer will taste like AlkaSeltzer. If you like beer that tastes like AlkaSeltzer then you will be fine. Most people would not be but that shouldn't matter to you. I'll note that the SMCL (secondary maximum contaminant limit) for sulfate in USEPA drinking water regs is 250 mg/L. SMCL's are based on aesthetic, not health, considerations IOW EPA has determined that most people find that water that has more than 250 mg/L sulfate doesn't taste very good. I'll also point out that the 'Vital Statistics about Burton-on-Trent water profile' do not represent any water that ever existed on the face of the earth (or anywhere in the universe) at reasonable pH. The numbers represent 17.7 mEq/L cations and 21.7 mEq/L anions. Cations and anions are balanced in any real water sample. Thus in trying to emulate this water supply you are chasing a phantasm - it never existed. This is why it is usually not worth while trying to duplicate the water of Piffelburg when trying to brew an authentic Piffelburger. The available profile is probably wrong and even if it were right you'd need to know how the Piffelburg brewers treated the water when they made beer. Furthermore it is quite possible that you can make a better Piffelburger than they did because they were stuck with Pifferlburg water and you can have any water you want.

I always recommend that people start out with light mineral content and work their way up. I suppose you could just as well start with high mineral content and work your way down but most people prefer beers with lighter mineral content so you'll probably get to satisfaction quicker starting out low.

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Old 08-30-2012, 01:30 AM   #10
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Thanks for reminding me of that content in Palmers. And for the advice to all. I'm not trying to be right or wrong ( edit: I know I used "wrong" above but it would be better to say "better") , this was totally an accident on my part, not intentional, due to carelessly reading instructions. I read these pages again in Palmer and Im going to stay optimistic until I drink it.

Edit: my hope is that most of the chemicals fail to get into solution, and/or the IIPA style will be enhanced by the remaining chemicals. Fingers crossed.

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