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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Brew Science > Sulfites in beer?
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Old 12-19-2010, 08:08 AM   #11
pinotbloger
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Great detailed explanation AJ.

For others curious about how much kmeta to add to their mash or wort, if you punch in the the values AJ gives into the first calculator I linked to you'll get the same answer. It just saves a bit of time and keeps the non chem majors from having to solve equations

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AJ: As an aside, when you say, "These tiny amounts are sufficient for biological stabilization of wine (and presumably beer)" I'm not sure I agree. The tiny amounts of molecular so2 *can* be sufficient in wine with proper upkeep, but is highly dependent on pH and oxygen uptake. The pH of most beers is higher than most wines (though there are more and more exceptions - especially in CA!). Molecular so2 is 6% of free so2 at a pH of 3, and .6% at a pH of 4, the normal range for wines. At beer pH it is even less (between .6% and .06% - vanishingly small amounts!). All this assumes you are interested in the anti-microbial properties of so2 for flavor stability (as the OP mentioned) and not just binding up aldehydes.

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Old 12-19-2010, 01:14 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by pinotbloger View Post
AJ: As an aside, when you say, "These tiny amounts are sufficient for biological stabilization of wine (and presumably beer)" I'm not sure I agree. The tiny amounts of molecular so2 *can* be sufficient in wine with proper upkeep, but is highly dependent on pH and oxygen uptake.
As I have almost 0 knowledge of wine making I'm not in a position to debate the point.

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All this assumes you are interested in the anti-microbial properties of so2 for flavor stability (as the OP mentioned)
Stability is the goal but, especially given the discussion of low conversion to SO2 (as opposed to HSO3-) at beer pH, I think the mechanism of interest is prevention of oxidation rather than microbial stability.



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..and not just binding up aldehydes.
Do the adducts taste any better than the aldehydes?

Cheers! [/QUOTE]
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Old 12-19-2010, 01:54 PM   #13
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Never heard of it. But I have heard of cinnimon used in beer as an antioxidant.
Charlie Papazian talked about it in one of the basic brewings, he adds a pinch to his mash tun for every brew. It evidently doesn't impart any tast to the mash in such a small quantities. I can't remember where he picked that tip up from.
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