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-   -   Suggested readings (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f128/suggested-readings-360569/)

carsonwarstler 10-12-2012 01:02 PM

I'm looking for some good reads to increase my knowledge on the various sciences involved with brewing. Can anyone recommend a good, relevant book on yeast, also one that talks about the science during the mash, and another that maybe talks about recipe building and how each ingredient is best used? Any info is appreciated, thanks.

duboman 10-12-2012 01:08 PM

"How to Brew" by Palmer
"Yeast" by Jamil Zanisheif and Chris White
"Radical Brewing" by Randy Mosher
"Designing Great Beers" by Ray Daniels
"Brewing Classic Styles" by Jamil

carsonwarstler 10-12-2012 07:18 PM

Definitely read John Palmer. I keep that close by but I was hoping to dig even deeper into the science that he talks about in his book. Thanks for the other suggestions.

Are those others pretty scientific? As in... Do they explain why or how, thru science, a particular part of brewing became the common practice?

duboman 10-12-2012 09:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by carsonwarstler (Post 4493826)
Definitely read John Palmer. I keep that close by but I was hoping to dig even deeper into the science that he talks about in his book. Thanks for the other suggestions.

Are those others pretty scientific? As in... Do they explain why or how, thru science, a particular part of brewing became the common practice?

"Yeast" is very scientific but in a simple way to help a brewer understand why and how yeast works and the best practices to achieve the best results in fermentation

"Designing Great Beers" goes into detailed analysis of ingredients used in particular styles and generally in what percentages they should be used. The book is slightly dated as styles have changed a bit but if you are looking at getting into designing your own brews it is a must reference IMO

"Radical Brewing" is not the most scientific, more of an interesting read but it does go into the history of brewing and the use of many different kinds of ingredients and adjuncts and ways to think about beer outside of the norm.

"Brewing Classic Styles" is not really scientific but contains a lot of recipes and again will provide you a good baseline for the creation of your own recipes

You can visit the Brewers Publications: http://www.homebrewersassociation.or...mended-reading

ajdelange 10-12-2012 10:16 PM

If you really want the science you will have to go to Hough, Briggs, Stevens and Young and/or DeClerck and/or Handbook of Brewing. Then there are more detailed brewing related books on yeast (there are, of course, many other books on yeast as well as they are used in other industries, cause diseases....), hops, malt and malting etc.

ArcLight 10-13-2012 01:49 AM

BrewChem 101 is a good introductory book. At least I found it interesting, maybe because I dont have a chemistry background.

I think the Yeast book wins by default. There isn't really any competition, but I don't think its all that good a book. Not bad, just not all taht good.

I really liked Designing Great Beers and How to Brew (when I started).

Some interesting stuff at this website: http://braukaiser.com/wiki/index.php?title=Main_Page

In a year there will be a book on Brewing Water by John Palmer.

carsonwarstler 10-13-2012 07:51 PM

Thanks to everyone for the info, can't wait to dig into them. Much appreciated, happy brewing.

DrunkenWeasel 10-13-2012 08:18 PM

After you've done several batches and read a couple of the basic "how to" books, I highly recommend "Beer--Tap Into the Art and Science of Brewing by Charles Bamforth to increase your depth of knowledge of the scientific principles. I recently completed the second edition, got a lot out of it, and thoroughly enjoyed it. Its focus is the industrial production, but with a little experience you can easily apply the lessons to your--assumed--favorite hobby. I've just started Briggs "Brewing, Science and Practice," which is essentially a textbook. Upon completion, I'll let you know what I think.


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