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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Brew Science > The science behind head
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Old 12-07-2012, 04:09 PM   #21
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First steps of an infection wont give you to much off flavours or aromas, It gets disgusting over time. You just hace to wait and see and if you think your beers are overcarbed or there is a chance for an infection, take precautions against possible bottle bombs

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Old 12-07-2012, 05:59 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by Obliviousbrew View Post
First steps of an infection wont give you to much off flavours or aromas, It gets disgusting over time. You just hace to wait and see and if you think your beers are overcarbed or there is a chance for an infection, take precautions against possible bottle bombs
Thanks. It has been sitting for several months, and in looking through my tasting notes,the initial impression was "a bit too much head" It has been gradually building up more and more.. The pressure does not seem to be excessve, just the usual little "cat fart" when I open the bottle. It had little pumpkin taste initially, and I thought if I closeted it for a few it might get better. Guess its time to drink these down and move on.
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Old 12-07-2012, 06:10 PM   #23
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It doesn't sound like infection. Probably slight overcarbing.

Can we get back on topic now?

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Old 12-07-2012, 06:11 PM   #24
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It doesn't sound like infection. Probably slight overcarbing.

Can we get back on topic now?
Exactly
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Old 12-07-2012, 06:42 PM   #25
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gusher infection will lead to a total lack of body and nearly no flavor - but very fizzy - like soda.

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Old 12-07-2012, 07:09 PM   #26
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gusher infection will lead to a total lack of body and nearly no flavor - but very fizzy - like soda.
Gusher gushes all of the beer out of the bottle leaving no head, or all head if you like.

Can we please get back on topic now?
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Old 12-08-2012, 03:59 PM   #27
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You got to account for your fermentation temperature or the higher temperature that the beer sat, not the temp when bottling.
I've heard several people make simiar statements, an I believe them to be true, but it runs counter to my (limited) understanding of the reasoning behind the carbination calculators. Please review my reasoning below and advise where my understanding is incomplete or incorrect.


When fermentation is concluded, there is residual c02 disolved in the beer. The amount of co2 that the solution can hold is temperature and pressure dependent. Higher pressure and lower temps permit absorption of more co2, and conversely lower pressure and higher temps force co2 out of solution. For that reason beer that is slightly overcarbed at room temp can be tamed by placing the unopened bottles in the frige, and when beer is opened, pressure in thecontainer is reduced, co2 is forced out of solution and creates the pleasant carnival of tiny bubbles that we all look forward to.

In order to calculate the proper amount of priming sugar to provide the desired carbonation level, the yeast must first be permitted to ferment out all the fermentable sugars. If residual fermentable sugars remain from the primary fermentation, and additional sugars are added at bottling, the result will be excessive carbopnation, possibly to the point of failure of the bottle. The amount of priming sugar required depends on the fermentability of the priming sugar and the amount of residual co2 in the beer. Since bottling is completed at atmospheric temperature, pressure is not an issue and is assumed to be at 1 atmosphere.

The temperature is taken at the time of bottling, since raising the temperature will force a portion of co2 created from initial fermentation out of solution.

Why is this wrong?
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Old 12-08-2012, 04:32 PM   #28
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With my limited english I´m having some problems following your train of toughts, yes atmospheric pressure and temperature of the liquid will impact on it´s capability of absorbing co2 but following your practical case: you fermented for 3 or 4 weeks until primary fermentation was done, I can´t find the temp you fermented at but let´s assume for practical issues it was 70F, then you cool it till 53F (this you did mention), when co2 is driven out of the solution at higher temps (ferm temp 70) it doesn´t magicly goes back to solution when you cool it at 53F, that co2 it´s already gone forget about it.... so if you bottle cold at 53F you got to account for 70F for your calculations... does it makes a little more sense now?

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Old 12-09-2012, 11:34 PM   #29
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When I calculate the priming sugar I base it on the wort temp that I measure before racking. I do not usually ramp temps up or down during fermentation, just set it in the middle of the published yeast range and let the temp controller operate within its default +-3 degrees F range. Some of the threads I read stated that the temp used should be the highest the wort experienced, not the present temps. It has been stated more than once, so I hesitate to discount the guidance. It just does not make sense to me. Your statements make sense to my understanding of the factors involved. And, just so you'll know, your english is perfectly uunderstandable to me, a native speaker.

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Old 12-11-2012, 03:04 PM   #30
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ONCE you CAP IT........it is all semantics.

The Co2 is contained. Warm it up, cool it down, (I don't recomend this) but once you cool it the final time, it wil be fine as far as carbonation.

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