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Old 01-26-2010, 12:30 AM   #21
jdc2
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Originally Posted by Bobby_M View Post
What kind of dry yeast was causing you problems? This wasn't like 15 years ago right?
Yes, it was a while ago. But I'm not going to start another
dry vs. liquid argument! There are posts everyday in the
beginner forum with people complaining about their lags
with dry yeast. There are bacteria that double in population
every 10 min, while yeast needs 1-2 hours. Lags are not
ever good.
Jim
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Old 01-26-2010, 02:34 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by Bobby_M View Post
We're talking about high residual alkalinity and thus a mash pH that is too basic as a function of water profile, not the flavor contribution of the various ions. Palmer's how to brew chapter 15 is a good place to start.

In fairness though, only knowing "very hard" and the alkalinity isn't enough to say for sure that there will be a mash pH problem. You really have to know total alkalinity, calcium and magnesium to figure out your residual alkalinity.

I had a big problem with beers lighter than 8 SRM for two reasons. One, my mash pH was in the low 6 area without the benefit of darker acidic malts and my sulfate levels were extremely low. I had a horrible tannin and soapy bitterness. It had nothing to do with flavor coverups or lackthereof.

What kind of dry yeast was causing you problems? This wasn't like 15 years ago right?
I emailed our water company about what I need and they said they were forwarding it to the testing facility or something. So hopefully I should find out the rest soon. I won't be living here for much longer so don't want to waste the money to send it to be tested. The place I will be moving is about an hour away and has similar water though. I'd like to get a ph meter instead of using strips, but I need to start testing that. I feel like I have the same issue as you. We'll find out soon enough.
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Old 01-26-2010, 12:18 PM   #23
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I just read in Terry Foster's book on porter in the
"Classic Beer Styles" series that the reason London had
good water for porter is because of the high carbonate
and low Ca/Mg sulfate. The acidity of the dark malts
counteracts the carbonate and gives the right pH for
the mash.

London water profile (ppm):
Calcium 50
Mg 20
Sodium 100
Carbonate 160
Sulfate 80
Chloride 60

Jim

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Old 01-28-2010, 07:32 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jdc2 View Post
There are posts everyday in the
beginner forum with people complaining about their lags
with dry yeast. There are bacteria that double in population
every 10 min, while yeast needs 1-2 hours. Lags are not
ever good.
Jim
Then they are the problem. Listen up trolldoll, lag times are no different for dry compared to liquid yeast. As a matter of fact, my dry yeast often takes off faster than does a liquid with a properly sized starter. Explain that.
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Old 01-28-2010, 08:33 PM   #25
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Then they are the problem. Listen up trolldoll, lag times are no different for dry compared to liquid yeast. As a matter of fact, my dry yeast often takes off faster than does a liquid with a properly sized starter. Explain that.
Most people don't make a starter with dry yeast. That's one reason
why they use it, because they don't want to bother.
Many don't even rehydrate it. If you have an actively
fermenting starter of anything, it should start quickly.
I have no idea what the op does.
Jim
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Old 01-29-2010, 02:46 AM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jdc2 View Post
Most people don't make a starter with dry yeast. That's one reason
why they use it, because they don't want to bother.
Many don't even rehydrate it. If you have an actively
fermenting starter of anything, it should start quickly.
I have no idea what the op does.
Jim
I do both. I make starters with liquid yeast or rehydrate the dry yeast, since starters are not advised. I too have had re-hydrated dry yeast take off much faster than a liquid starter. Like I said in the other thread, my room is a steady 64-65, constantly monitored.
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