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Old 03-26-2013, 02:56 AM   #11
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Here's one very similar to the one I bought:

http://www.bulkreefsupply.com/brs-4-...tem-75gpd.html

I had them leave off the "DI" part, and saved $10. I don't know if they still do that, but that's what I did. It was a bit over a year ago.
I have that one + inline TDS meter. It's quite nice.
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Old 03-26-2013, 12:57 PM   #12
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I bought the 5 stage system for $150 from AirWaterIce. Uses Filmtec membrane, came with TDS meter, shutoff valve, and DI bypass. In fact, I just removed the DI cartridge.

I bought a pack of sediment and 5 micron filters at $3/ea from Amazon. I rotate the sediment filter every 3 months, the first carbon less regularly, and the second carbon finer filter annually.

I use it for more than brewing, too. Watering seed starters, using RO water in humidifier so salts aren't sprayed over house in winter, filling drinking water containers.

I also installed a valve on a trash bucket to capture waste brine, and pump it.through chillers to chill on brew days. For brewing at least, I don't really waste water since I need copious water to chill even if I didn't start with RO.

My water comes from the tap at 120 ppm TDS, and now I average 3 ppm after RO. Blank slate.

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Old 03-26-2013, 01:42 PM   #13
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I bought the 5 stage system for $150 from AirWaterIce. Uses Filmtec membrane, came with TDS meter, shutoff valve, and DI bypass. In fact, I just removed the DI cartridge.

I bought a pack of sediment and 5 micron filters at $3/ea from Amazon. I rotate the sediment filter every 3 months, the first carbon less regularly, and the second carbon finer filter annually.

I use it for more than brewing, too. Watering seed starters, using RO water in humidifier so salts aren't sprayed over house in winter, filling drinking water containers.

I also installed a valve on a trash bucket to capture waste brine, and pump it.through chillers to chill on brew days. For brewing at least, I don't really waste water since I need copious water to chill even if I didn't start with RO.

My water comes from the tap at 120 ppm TDS, and now I average 3 ppm after RO. Blank slate.
Wow! You must have a lot of sediment in your water???? In general, sediment filters do not need to be replaced until the flow rate is significantly affected. As they clog, they filter even better! There is not typically a 'breakthrough' of sediment particles from those filters.

+1 on the in-line TDS meter. I have the cheaper HM 2-way TDS meter and it provided guidance for when my membrane required replacement. Its well worth the $20 and it will help you avoid replacing that expensive membrane prematurely. I got almost 2 years out of my last membrane.
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Old 03-26-2013, 01:58 PM   #14
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Wow! You must have a lot of sediment in your water???? In general, sediment filters do not need to be replaced until the flow rate is significantly affected. As they clog, they filter even better! There is not typically a 'breakthrough' of sediment particles from those filters.
My water is from DC. Falls Church City basically takes Army Corps' water, and throws a huge `tax' on it despite the fact that I live in a separate municipal county (I bring that up because it bugs me, Virginia's municipality system is broken).

Anyhow, that Army Corps water runs through some ancient plumbing that is beyond repair. During the last power outage where water ran slowly, they announced that tap water needed to be treated and/or boiled because of the garbage and organisms it picked up at reduced pressure.

My sediment filters take about a month to turn a nasty orange. I feel like at three months, I'd rather just replace it for $3 than watch it get nastier, but I hadn't thought that it would actually filter more that way.

This is where my ignorance shows because I never asked. Sorry to hijack, but Martin, should I just leave the sediment filter alone until flow rate is reduced? I just didn't want to put that work on the carbon filters, or worse, the membrane. Or is that sediment filter discoloration normal, and I can get even more life out of my bulk filters?
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Old 03-31-2013, 05:51 PM   #15
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My issues with an RO system is only partly due to the cost of the system and the inevitable diddling around with it v. just buying the RO water at the store. There's also the issue of waste. Before you buy any RO system, be sure you know how many gallons it wastes for each gallon of RO water it generates. Some systems are more than 3:1. And I would not buy such a system for that reason alone.

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Old 03-31-2013, 06:13 PM   #16
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My issues with an RO system is only partly due to the cost of the system and the inevitable diddling around with it v. just buying the RO water at the store. There's also the issue of waste. Before you buy any RO system, be sure you know how many gallons it wastes for each gallon of RO water it generates. Some systems are more than 3:1. And I would not buy such a system for that reason alone.
No matter what you do, RO is going to have waste. If you pick up 10-20 gallons of RO from the store, how much water did they waste (surely it went into the sewer), and how much fuel did you burn for the journey (if your trip is solely for RO water)?

When you chill your beer, how much water do you waste? Or do you recirculate icewater through your chiller? And if that's the case, how much energy went into freezing that ice?

I just capture the RO "waste" water and chill my beer with it. Waste is directed to a cheap garbage can. Then capture the resulting hot water from chilling beer to mix PBW for post-brew cleanup. That brine still went through filters, it just has higher TDS suitable for cleansing, sans chlorine. When I filter RO water not used for brewing, I feed the waste water into rain barrels to water the lawn or garden. If you're creative, the waste in minimal.
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Old 03-31-2013, 06:18 PM   #17
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Lots of fish shops that cater to marine aquariums have ro systems in the shop and sell it by the gallon. There used to be one in my area that sold it by the 5 gallons.

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Old 03-31-2013, 06:56 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yooper View Post
Here's one very similar to the one I bought:

http://www.bulkreefsupply.com/brs-4-...tem-75gpd.html

I had them leave off the "DI" part, and saved $10. I don't know if they still do that, but that's what I did. It was a bit over a year ago.
How is the flow rate out of these systems? I do 15 gallon batches and use about 20 gallons when I brew and they list most as 50-75 gallons per day. So would it take 6 hours to fill a 20 gallon pot?
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Old 03-31-2013, 07:33 PM   #19
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I have the Kinetico system, with the main filters

And this system that serves the sink drinking water spigot.

I get good flow rate from the drinking water and the filters are over a year old and are at about 50% now.
Not sure what the sink unit cost as we bout the whole system in one go.
Not much help am I? lol

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Old 03-31-2013, 09:00 PM   #20
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No matter what you do, RO is going to have waste. {snip}
1. This is quite true; however, I am on a well, and am not going to put that kind of load on it.

2. Part of a daily trip when all bases are touched; no more or less fuel involved.

3. My chilling water, at present, goes on the garden, more relevant in Spring than in Fall. So that's partly wasted, but the alternative is not to brew. I'm looking at recirculating the chilling water through a handy cistern, but that project hasn't matured yet, as I'm starting to think about how to put the cistern back to its original use in the broader context of water use in the household. (I'm just providing an answer to what you mentioned, not really sure how this pertains to the RO issue.)

4. I'm not sure I can agree from the information you've provided that anyone (= me, presumably) can keep waste "minimal" by just being "creative." I keep it as minimal as is reasonable, and reasonable means minimizing the load on our well.
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