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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Brew Science > Is Palmer wrong about priming sugar?
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Old 05-12-2009, 05:15 PM   #21
RowdyBrew
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I'm looking into priming my beers in cornys as I don't have enough room in my kegerator to force carb more than 2 kegs at a time as well as various other complications. Anybody know of a nomograph for keg priming or should I just subtract the normal weight difference between keg priming and bottle priming?

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Old 12-30-2010, 08:50 AM   #22
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I am lagering two beers at 35 degrees. Going by Palmers nomograph, I should be mixing in about 2.2oz of priming sugar. Right?

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Old 12-30-2010, 03:23 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yooper View Post

Lastly, if we deleted every post that had a "stupid" question, I'd been down to 2,000 posts!
2,662 to be exact.
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Old 12-31-2010, 09:46 PM   #24
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This is a great topic. I too thought that the temperature was the serving temperature.

So, If i ferment an Ale at 68F for a three week long primary, and then crash cool the beer in my garage at 38F for two days. Immediately after the two days, i bring the beer inside, rack it, add the priming sugar and bottle it. it sits in my basement where it warms up to 62F during conditioning.

What temperature should I use on the nomograph?

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Old 01-05-2011, 06:01 PM   #25
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This is mostly over my head but very interesting to me. I hope someone figures this out so I can just do what I'm told.

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Old 01-05-2011, 06:35 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sjlammer View Post
This is a great topic. I too thought that the temperature was the serving temperature.

So, If i ferment an Ale at 68F for a three week long primary, and then crash cool the beer in my garage at 38F for two days. Immediately after the two days, i bring the beer inside, rack it, add the priming sugar and bottle it. it sits in my basement where it warms up to 62F during conditioning.

What temperature should I use on the nomograph?
The highest temperature it was at after co2 production ceased. So 68.

Think about what is happening. At 68 co2 production happens and the liquid will have as much co2 dissolved as it can at 68. When you cool to 38 co2 solubility increases but there is no source of new co2 so all that happens is most of the existing co2 stays in solution. When you warm to 62 F you still have less than or equal to the amount of co2 that saturates beer at 68 F so again, much of it will stay in solution.
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