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Old 01-22-2014, 01:03 PM   #11
Ilan34
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Update: I could only get the beer up to 85 degrees. Got set up to bottle and took one more sample. Still tasted like crap.

Executive decision: Dumped. Re-brew the next day.

Sad to see it go to waste but I don't regret it. The next day's brew went fantastic and my pH was right in range. It's going to turn out really nice, I think.

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Old 01-22-2014, 02:24 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by invivoSaccharomyces View Post
It wouldn't take long. Solubility chemistry usually happens pretty fast on our time scales. 15 minutes ought to give you all the difference you're going to see.
Not where carbonate and bicarbonate are involved. They can take a long time to react. This is a potential reason that so many guys starting out with a pH meter, some acid (lactic) and some base (bicarbonate) wind up chasing their tails, as apparently OP did, in trying to hit proper mash pH. Even without bicarbonate being involved it takes a long time to reach equilibrium. In my brewing last Moday pH was 5.33 a few minutes after dough-in. Half an hour later it was 5.44. If you have Palmer's new book you can see how the titration curves for malts shift over a period of half an hour.
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Old 01-22-2014, 05:12 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajdelange View Post
Not where carbonate and bicarbonate are involved. They can take a long time to react. This is a potential reason that so many guys starting out with a pH meter, some acid (lactic) and some base (bicarbonate) wind up chasing their tails, as apparently OP did, in trying to hit proper mash pH. Even without bicarbonate being involved it takes a long time to reach equilibrium. In my brewing last Moday pH was 5.33 a few minutes after dough-in. Half an hour later it was 5.44. If you have Palmer's new book you can see how the titration curves for malts shift over a period of half an hour.
Welp, if that's the case, how do you make adjustments on the fly? At what point in the mash is it pointless to keep adjusting?

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Old 01-23-2014, 04:02 AM   #14
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Welp, if that's the case, how do you make adjustments on the fly?
You don't if at all possible. When doing a new brew you should, if you don't have good malt models for a pH predictor, make test mashes until you find the acid additions that work. If, in an actual mash, you find you are off a bit then it is often best to just note that and correct the next time you brew. If it is an elaborate program like a decoction you may have a bit more flexibility. In the brew session I mentioned earlier I accidntally put Wyermans pneumatic pils into the pH predictor when I was actually using the floor pils and got a sauemalz addition that was too small. When I noticed pH was too high after returning the first decoction I had plenty of time to grind up some more sauermalz and add it to the second decoction.

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At what point in the mash is it pointless to keep adjusting?
I guess its never too late as you probably won't go so far as to denature an enzyme but remember that heat is degrading them too. With experience you will be able to judge the likely asymptote of a series of pH reading and that lets you get a correction going sooner than waiting the full half hour.
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Old 01-23-2014, 02:19 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 241 View Post
All I ever add to light/hoppy beers are what you stated. I use RO

2-3% aciduated malt
1 tsp/5 gal Cacl2
1 tsp gypsum

Seems to put you right at or around 5.2-5.3
What is 2-3% aciduated malt ?
In 5 Gallons what does that work out to be?

I have RODI and I am doing an extract brew right now

The above is what was suggested, but not listing the malt
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Old 01-23-2014, 04:42 PM   #16
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SnowRaven, as mentioned in the other thread, aciduated would not apply unless you were doing a partial mash.

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Old 01-23-2014, 05:39 PM   #17
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SnowRaven, as mentioned in the other thread, aciduated would not apply unless you were doing a partial mash.
Got it

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f128/iri...5/#post5848408
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Old 01-28-2014, 06:39 PM   #18
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6.4g of baking soda in a 2.5 gal batch is a ton of sodium. Could that be what the off flavor was?

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Old 01-28-2014, 07:44 PM   #19
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6.4g of baking soda in a 2.5 gal batch is a ton of sodium. Could that be what the off flavor was?
Yeah, most likely. Never doing that again.
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