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Old 07-28-2011, 12:23 AM   #1
1971hemicuda
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Default Oxyginating wort for high gravity wort

I brewed a golden strong, 1.084 SG, pitched @ 70 and the yeast went crazy! It was in a room where the ambient temp was 73 and it ramped up real high and was real active. Its been a few days and has since slowed down.

Anyways, I always oxyginate before pitching with an oxygen stone. I blew more O2 in 24 hours later (maybe a 10 second burst) and since slowing down I was wondering if it could use another's blast? There isn't much activity but I'm not worried about stuck fermentation, just curious if it would help the yeast, or hurt the beer

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Old 07-28-2011, 02:20 AM   #2
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You definitely do not want to add more O2. The oxygen is needed primarily for sterol synthesis, which is needed for cell reproduction. If you blast more O2 now, you likely won't get another reproduction phase (since the alcohol level is already high), but you will introduce oxygen into your wort that won't get absorbed by the yeast. That oxygen will likely oxidize your beer.

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Old 07-28-2011, 02:57 PM   #3
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Fermentation(also called anaerobic respiration) is cellular respiration that happens in the absence of oxygen. Adding oxygen can push you into aerobic respiration (cellular respiration in the presence of oxygen). The reason for going from one to another is an efficiency issue of the yeast cell to make its energy. The purpose for introducing extra oxygen initially was to help yeast cells reproduce, not to produce extra alcohol.

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Old 07-28-2011, 03:46 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bstux
Fermentation(also called anaerobic respiration)
I knew it was for yeast reproduction, but I didn't know that fermentation was anaerobic respiration. Just saying that alone gave me the answer I was looking for. Now, I jut have to sit and wait it out! Who ever said patience was a virtue never made delicious Belgian beer!
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Old 07-28-2011, 04:20 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1971hemicuda View Post
I knew it was for yeast reproduction, but I didn't know that fermentation was anaerobic respiration. Just saying that alone gave me the answer I was looking for. Now, I jut have to sit and wait it out! Who ever said patience was a virtue never made delicious Belgian beer!
Arguably some of the most virtuous men have been making Belgian beer for ages.

*Eyes Scourmont Abbey*
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Old 07-28-2011, 04:29 PM   #6
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I recently did a 1.088 batch and did exactly what you did with the extra blast of O2 at about 24 hours. That's apparently all it needed because it reached the projected FG in less than 2 weeks.

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Old 07-28-2011, 04:44 PM   #7
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Most Belgians have a decent amount of sugar in them, mine was the last batch I used an aquarium pump on, it went to .006 in 15 days.

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Old 08-04-2011, 02:55 PM   #8
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On the last two high grav beers I made (both 1.070+) I experimented with a 90 second shot of O2 at 18 hours (for one) and 24 hours (for the other) post pitching (via stone and O2 bottle).

The results are purely subjective -- but these turned out to be the two best beers I've made this season. Both attenuated at 77-80% with Safale 05 -- and neither are showing any signs of oxidization (bottled and have been conditioning @ 70F) for 1 to 1.5 months.

One beer was an Oaked Wee Heavy, the other was Denny's Rye IPA. The wee heavy still needs several more months -- but the IPA is tasting fantastic now.

I've also heard Jamil & co. talk about post pitch oxygenation. I think that's going to be my SOP from now on. 24 hours post-pitching may be the cut-off -- I would worry about oxygenation after that -- but the burst definitely seems to help with attenuation (and possibly flavor).

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Old 08-04-2011, 05:47 PM   #9
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Arguably some of the most virtuous men have been making Belgian beer for ages.

*Eyes Scourmont Abbey*
LOL - that is funny. And I will leave it at that.
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Old 08-04-2011, 06:09 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobbytuck View Post
On the last two high grav beers I made (both 1.070+) I experimented with a 90 second shot of O2 at 18 hours (for one) and 24 hours (for the other) post pitching (via stone and O2 bottle).

The results are purely subjective -- but these turned out to be the two best beers I've made this season. Both attenuated at 77-80% with Safale 05 -- and neither are showing any signs of oxidization (bottled and have been conditioning @ 70F) for 1 to 1.5 months.

One beer was an Oaked Wee Heavy, the other was Denny's Rye IPA. The wee heavy still needs several more months -- but the IPA is tasting fantastic now.

I've also heard Jamil & co. talk about post pitch oxygenation. I think that's going to be my SOP from now on. 24 hours post-pitching may be the cut-off -- I would worry about oxygenation after that -- but the burst definitely seems to help with attenuation (and possibly flavor).
Did you give the same 90 second shot at pitching? Had you done this initial oxygen with the previous batches?

I just bottled a 1.085 IIPA for which I pitched 2 packets of rehydrated S04 and fermented at 64 degrees and I ramped it up to 68 for a couple of days after 5 days at 64. I gave it 90s of pure oxygen at pitching only. (And my recipe did have about 1 pound of corn sugar)

I ended with about 80% attenuation. This was actually more attenuation then I expected (based on 75% suggested in online experiences) but it tasted great at bottling.

I guess my question is, what can I expect to gain from a second shot of oxygen if I'm already getting 80% attenuation with a yeast like S04? I think "Yeast" may address this but I don't remember off hand...
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