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Old 12-03-2012, 04:34 PM   #1
PupThePup
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Default Mathematical Relationship: Saccharification Time -> Degrees Lintner

Is there a mathematical relationship between saccharification time and Degrees Lintner?

In other words if a grain analysis sheet states the saccharification time as 20 minutes what does that relate to in degrees Lintner?

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Old 12-03-2012, 04:46 PM   #2
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I'd imagine as a general rule that a higher Lintner value woul mean a shorter conversion time, since higher Lintner values indicate more enzymes (afaik). I'm curious, though, why do you ask?

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Old 12-03-2012, 06:52 PM   #3
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Take the Weyermann Diastatic Barley Malt Analysis sheet - 300WK = (300 + 16) / 3.5 = 90.3 Lintner

On that same spec sheet it says 'Replaces all or portion of Pale Ale or Pilsner malt'.

Now take the Weyermann Pale Ale Malt Analysis sheet - ?WK = ?Lintner

It's not specified. So how can you compare the Diastatic Barley Malt with the Pale Ale Malt?

You might look at an American Malt with the same name, find that it has a diastatic power of 85 Lintner and use that value for the Weyermann, the alternative is the sac. time, but that doesn't lend itself to determining if you have enough DP available to convert your mash.

Reasons to know the WK/Lintner values:
1.) For apples to apples comparison of grains.
2.) To determine if a malt is self converting Lintner >= 35.
3.) An estimate of the DP power available to convert your mash.

Reasons to relate Sac. Time to WK/Lintner:
1.) WK/Lintner is not always specified on the Malt Analysis Sheet.

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Old 12-03-2012, 06:55 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PupThePup View Post
Take the Weyermann Diastatic Barley Malt Analysis sheet - 300WK = (300 + 16) / 3.5 = 90.3 Lintner

On that same spec sheet it says 'Replaces all or portion of Pale Ale or Pilsner malt'.

Now take the Weyermann Pale Ale Malt Analysis sheet - ?WK = ?Lintner

It's not specified. So how can you compare the Diastatic Barley Malt with the Pale Ale Malt?

You might look at an American Malt with the same name, find that it has a diastatic power of 85 Lintner and use that value for the Weyermann, the alternative is the sac. time, but that doesn't lend itself to determining if you have enough DP available to convert your mash.

Reasons to know the WK/Lintner values:
1.) For apples to apples comparison of grains.
2.) To determine if a malt is self converting Lintner >= 35.
2.) An estimate of the DP power available to convert your mash.
Why don't you just email Weyermann to ask for the DP?
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Old 12-03-2012, 07:06 PM   #5
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I can certainly do that. I thought I may be missing something that would allow me to calculate it from the information given.

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Old 12-03-2012, 07:08 PM   #6
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Well, the site says that it can be used as 100% of the mash (http://www.weyermann.de/eng/produkte.asp?idkat=15&umenue=yes&idmenue=37&sprach e=2), so it's definitely self converting. I don't know of any way to determine the DP from the conversion time, though. If I were going to guess I'd say that a similar conversion time == a similar DP.

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Old 12-10-2012, 02:53 PM   #7
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saccharification time is affected by more than just the diastatic power. And unless you can quantify and account for all the other parameters, a mathematical relationship between the two will be of little use.

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