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Old 02-11-2012, 07:14 PM   #1
Marshi
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Default Maillard reactions

So: I becoming familiar with Maillard reactions, but have a few questions:

My understanding is that a majority of Maillard reactions during the brewing process occur during the boil, but how much Maillard reactions (and the resulting productions of Melanoidins) occur during the mash, if at all?

Also, are there Maillard reactions that occur during the malting process that produce Melanoidins in the grains themselves? Particularly in crystal malts that stewed at high temps?

My last question is perhaps the most abstract and confusing, but if someone feels up for it, I'd appreciate an answer: Is there ever incentive or ability to avoid creating Melanoidins and keeping sugars in their original form (not bonded with amino acids)? For example, after you mash and lauter, your wort will have a certain amount of maltose. After the boil, however, much of that maltose might have bonded to certain amino acids and created Malanoidins as a result of the high temperatures (i.e. Maillaird reactions). Are there scenarios where one wants to avoid the Maillaird reactions to keep the maltose in its original state, and what are the ways to avoid that?

Thanks Ya'll!

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Old 02-11-2012, 07:29 PM   #2
ajdelange
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marshi View Post
My understanding is that a majority of Maillard reactions during the brewing process occur during the boil, but how much Maillard reactions (and the resulting productions of Melanoidins) occur during the mash, if at all?
Does the mash get darker as it progresses?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marshi View Post
Also, are there Maillard reactions that occur during the malting process that produce Melanoidins in the grains themselves? Particularly in crystal malts that stewed at high temps?
Are malts darker than raw barley?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marshi View Post
Are there scenarios where one wants to avoid the Maillaird reactions to keep the maltose in its original state, and what are the ways to avoid that?
Very light beers like Kölsch I guess. As available amino acid, high temperature and high pH are the fundamental causes of these reactions I would say that poverty of amino acid, low temperature and acid conditions would result in low production. Of course there are limits to the extent to which you could reduce any of these and still make beer
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