Spike Brewing 12.5 Conical Fermenter Giveaway!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Brew Science > Lab results are in and need assistance

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 01-06-2013, 02:53 AM   #51
Wynne-R
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Texas
Posts: 891
Liked 96 Times on 62 Posts
Likes Given: 75

Default

Ooops! I was thinking K as in kalium (potassium.) Obviously I didn’t think it through. It is indeed KH, I checked the package. It was a brain fart.

For those following along at home, there are two different kits you get at the aquarium store, GH and KH.

GH is General Hardness which has to do with metal ions, calcium and magnesium. It’s sort of a ‘ring around the collar’ measure of how much detergent you need to wash stuff.

KH is Carbonate Hardness which has to do with how much acid it takes to move the pH of the water. That’s the one brewers care about.

Thanks, Martin, for keeping me honest.

__________________
Wynne-R is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-06-2013, 01:17 PM   #52
ajdelange
Senior Member
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: McLean/Ogden, Virginia/Quebec
Posts: 5,799
Liked 563 Times on 464 Posts
Likes Given: 15

Default

KH is a very confusing term and I always have to pause when I see it. Karbonathärte - carbonate hardness - is not hardness at all but the part of the hardness, if there is any, which is electrically neutralized by, mostly, bicarbonate and carbonate i.e the alkalinity. Water containing no or little calcium but lots of sodium, for example, the water from a home water softener, has appreciable Karbonathärte even though it has no or little hardness.

__________________
ajdelange is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-31-2013, 01:03 AM   #53
j2bink
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 57
Liked 3 Times on 2 Posts

Default

I purchased the Milwaukee 250ml buffers for 4.01 and 7.01. I was thinking about what is the best way to prepare the buffers for calibration. I'm thinking about getting 50ml beakers to use. I would like to know if there is a minimal volume of buffer required to properly calibrate the meter and does my buffers require to be mixed with DI? I assume no mixing is required since no instructions are printed on the bottle. Please review the attachment. Thanks

2013-01-05-09.07.33.jpg  
__________________
j2bink is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-02-2013, 01:15 PM   #54
j2bink
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 57
Liked 3 Times on 2 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by j2bink View Post
I purchased the Milwaukee 250ml buffers for 4.01 and 7.01. I was thinking about what is the best way to prepare the buffers for calibration. I'm thinking about getting 50ml beakers to use. I would like to know if there is a minimal volume of buffer required to properly calibrate the meter and does my buffers require to be mixed with DI? I assume no mixing is required since no instructions are printed on the bottle. Please review the attachment. Thanks
Anyone can help?
__________________
j2bink is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-02-2013, 02:04 PM   #56
ajdelange
Senior Member
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: McLean/Ogden, Virginia/Quebec
Posts: 5,799
Liked 563 Times on 464 Posts
Likes Given: 15

Default

Shot glasses sound good to me but small plastic (or glass) beakers are fine. The things in the photo are nice because you can close the cap which prevents cockroaches from falling in, keeps dust out etc and sealed in one of them you should be as good as sealed in the bottle. You only need a thimblefull - enough to wet both the bulb and reference aperture but keep in mind that each time you go into the buffer you will be carrying some DI water with you even if you are following the instructions in the Calibration article (Stickies http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f128/ph-meter-calibration-302256/). The point being that the more buffer you have in the cup, the less this water will dilute it.

buffercup.jpg  
__________________
ajdelange is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-02-2013, 03:52 PM   #57
mabrungard
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Carmel, IN
Posts: 2,685
Liked 181 Times on 158 Posts
Likes Given: 24

Default

Why use another container? I just pour each buffer into the cap of each bottle. The probe of my Milwaukee MW-101 will fit in the cap and the cap is deep enough to fully submerge the bulb. After calibration, the buffer in the caps is tossed in the sink.

__________________

Martin B
Carmel, IN
BJCP National
Foam Blowers of Indiana (FBI)

Brewing Water Information at:
https://sites.google.com/site/brunwater/

Like Bru'n Water on Facebook for occasional discussions on brewing water and Bru'n Water

mabrungard is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-02-2013, 04:27 PM   #58
ajdelange
Senior Member
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: McLean/Ogden, Virginia/Quebec
Posts: 5,799
Liked 563 Times on 464 Posts
Likes Given: 15

Default

Danger of contamination - small but finite. I treat the stock bottle with the same level of respect that only my wife receives. If I'm weighing out a quantity of some chemical and the spoon has a few extra mg I don't put them back in the stock bottle for the same reason. I know there is probably more danger of contamination from the spoon than there is from anything the substance is likely to pick up from the air while in the spoon. I guess it's just habit based on what my notions of what GLP ought to be (though I have no idea what they really are).

__________________
ajdelange is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-02-2013, 04:49 PM   #59
mabrungard
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Carmel, IN
Posts: 2,685
Liked 181 Times on 158 Posts
Likes Given: 24

Default

I agree. I do shake the 'used' buffers out of the caps, but I suppose there is that possibility of contamination in some form. I'll live with it.

I just purchased the buffer capsules, so I'll be able to replace (recreate) my buffer standards on a more frequent basis now. Before, I was going a year or two before replacing the standards. I know, that is not very good practice!

__________________

Martin B
Carmel, IN
BJCP National
Foam Blowers of Indiana (FBI)

Brewing Water Information at:
https://sites.google.com/site/brunwater/

Like Bru'n Water on Facebook for occasional discussions on brewing water and Bru'n Water

mabrungard is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-02-2013, 05:15 PM   #60
j2bink
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 57
Liked 3 Times on 2 Posts

Default

I like the way this thread is going. Very informative. I have questions about the plastic beaker with snap cap. Where can I order them and how big are they. Importantly, I'm assuming my 250ml Milwaukee buffers don't need pre-mixed (picture above) and how long do you keep your used buffer in the plastic beaker before you pour a new one?

Thanks.

__________________
j2bink is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Assistance Aquavitae Mead Forum 5 09-24-2012 05:07 AM
Sure could use some assistance Newby2this Wine Making Forum 18 06-28-2012 12:44 PM
bad results with malty beers, great results with hoppy beers liebertron General Beer Discussion 15 02-15-2012 05:03 PM
Need a bit of assistance please Sagesavvy Soda Making 2 08-25-2010 06:51 PM
Need a Bit of Assistance... Recusit8m All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 6 02-21-2010 08:04 PM