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Old 04-06-2013, 01:18 AM   #1
Merleti
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Default inositol

I use R.O. water and adjust it to the area the beer is known for with Beer Smith2. Reviewing Palmer's How to Brew. I came across brewers in Pilsen using an acid rest to help the enzyme phytase acidify in the mash. Phytase breaks down phytin into insoluble calcium, magnesium phosphates and myo-inositol (a vitamin). I add calcium and mag, but no inositol. Has anyone added this? If so how much?

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Old 04-06-2013, 11:09 PM   #2
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I am not sure I understand the question, are you wanting to add inositol? If so, why?

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Old 04-07-2013, 03:44 AM   #3
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What you are after in the phytin reaction is the inorganic phosphate as that coalesces with calcium to precipitate hydroxyl apatite thus releasing hydrogen ions. The myo-inositol is just the by product. There would be no point in adding more as there is certainly more than the yeast need derived from malt (grams per killogram).

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Old 04-07-2013, 07:17 PM   #4
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I guess I am just worried about the lack of minerals resulting in the mash not being able to reach the proper pH.

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Old 04-07-2013, 08:40 PM   #5
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Mineral additions are generally insufficient to insure proper mash pH. Acid in some form is required in most cases. See the Primer.

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Old 04-09-2013, 10:07 PM   #6
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I understand the grain does supply minerals and inositol. If pure water has shown the need for mineral additions on top of what the grain supplies then shouldn't inositol be needed as well?

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Old 04-10-2013, 12:40 PM   #7
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It hasn't. The Congress Mash which is the basis for specification of extract potential of grain is a distilled water mash.

Grain contains plenty of most minerals except calcium. This is why calcium is added to the mash in many cases - so it can react with the inorganic phosphate released by the malt to produce pH lowering protons. Grain also contains less chloride and sulfate than may be desired for beer flavor and body and that's why these ions are often added (as the calcium salts) to low mineral water. There is no need to add more phosphate for reaction with calcium. If further acidification is desired (and it usually is) then brewers add acid directly in the form of dark malt, mineral acid or acidulated malt.

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Old 04-10-2013, 01:56 PM   #8
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Got it. I was just nervous since I use R.O.D.I. water. I'll keep and eye on the pH and go from there. Thanks for all your help ajdelange.

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