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Old 12-20-2010, 12:46 PM   #1
boss429
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Default inconsistency between bottles(watery/dry hop)

ok well since my first batch of brew I have been consdering to compare the first bottles I bottle vs. the last bottles I bottle.

The results are that the first bottles taste watery and lack aroma

The last bottles do not taste watery and have alot of dry hop aroma.

I am requesting strategies/temperatures for dry hopping consistently in a bucket.

My background is that I do IPAs and I dont use a secondary which I am now considering. I am looking for techniques that will help with diffusion of hops w/o oxidation of my beer thats in a plastic bucket.

I would also like to know how industrial beer productions prevent this, just for fun.

Thanks, I know I offer little knowledge on the forum but thats because I look for solutions by searching the forums.

thanks to all who reply as I have had this problem since the begining.

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Old 12-20-2010, 12:52 PM   #2
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That's because you are simply openning the first bottles way too soon. That's why the last one's taste better that the others. It's simple bottle conditioning.
The 3 weeks at 70 degrees, that we recommend is the minimum time it takes for average gravity beers to carbonate and condition. Higher grav beers take longer. Lower temperatures take longer.

And just because a beer is carbed @ three weeks, doesn't mean that it doesn't still taste like crap and won't need more time to condition.

Stouts and porters have taken me between 6 and 8 weeks to carb up..I have a 1.090 Belgian strong that took three months to carb up.

Temp and gravity are the two factors that contribute to the time it takes to carb beer. But if a beer's not ready yet, or seems low carbed, and you added the right amount of sugar to it, then it's not stalled, it's just not time yet.

Everything you need to know about carbing and conditioning, can be found here Of Patience and Bottle Conditioning. With emphasis on the word, "patience."

There's an old saying in homebrewing, that the last bottle you drink of a batch is always the best.

And Commercial breweries do a lot of things that homebrewerss don't do, for example pitch enough yeast for one thing, and utilize temp control which mitigates a lot of conditioning time, plus they are usually bottling already carbed beer which means most of the 3+ weeks required even to carb the beer is already done.

But if you are bottle carbing and conditioning then you are a prisoner of the natural process that occurs over time, so if you are openning early they just aren't going to be ready yet...pretty simple.

There's great discussions about how dogfish goes so fast from grain to glass going on here all over the place. here's one of the threads. http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f14/dogf...ht=brewmasters

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Old 12-21-2010, 03:55 AM   #3
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I'm honored you replied haha as I follow what you recomend your bottling all the way.

but...

I dont understand how if I compared 2 bottles that have been in the same box, in the same room, in same temperature conditions, with the same amount of time to bottle condition should taste different.

I am not saying the beers are good or bad and If i did I take that back.

What I am saying is that there is a difference between the 3rd beer to be bottled and the 47th bottle to be filled.

I further went to drink 1 from the middle(as I was too lazy to number all bottles) and it actually was different as well.

I really dont know what I could be doing wrong. Does anyone else experience this?

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Old 12-21-2010, 04:45 AM   #4
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So you are getting different results within the same bottling batch eh? Do you use a bottling bucket, or are you bottling straight from the primary?

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Old 12-21-2010, 10:43 AM   #5
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A tiny difference in temps between bottles in storage can affect the yeasties, speed them up or slow them down. Like if you store them in a closet against a warm wall, the beers closest to the heat source may be a tad warmer than those further way, so thy may carb/condition at slightly different rates. I usually store a batch in 2 seperate locations in my loft 1 case in my bedroom which is a little warmer, and the other in the closet in the lving room, which being in a larger space is a tad cooler, at least according to the thermostat next to that closet. It can be 5-10 degrees warmer in my bedroom. So I usually start with that case at three weeks. Giving the other half a little more time.

Each little bottle is a seperate microcosm, so they will react slightly different to each other. But usually they all will balance out given enough time.

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Old 12-21-2010, 05:51 PM   #6
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There is quite a bit to what Revvy is saying. When I started brewing many, many moons ago I make a pumpkin ale from extract. I let it set in the bottle in a closet for about 3 weeks and drank what I though was all of it. I remember my wife saying to me that was the last of it. About 3 months later my wife looking in the same closet for something and said, "hey, you actually have two bottles left. I chilled the last two and they were like night and day compared to the ones I drank three weeks after bottling. The last two bottles were much smoother with a much crisper hoppy flavor. I was amazed.

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