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Old 04-30-2014, 12:42 AM   #1
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Default I want to brew this week and I have hard water

Taste wise out of the faucet it's drinkeable but even though it's rural city water it has alot of Lime and calcium, leaves residue after awhile on all the faucets and I have to take CLR to the facuet screens to clear them out. So if I'm planning to brew my first AG batch this weekend do I need a substitue water source? I'm trying to get a water report from the city and am in the process of getting a water softener just to save my water appliances. But anyway what about water for this weekend. Is bottled gallon spring water reliable?

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Old 04-30-2014, 12:43 AM   #2
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I'd use bottled water. It's what I use.

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Old 04-30-2014, 12:52 AM   #3
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Bottled spring water would be great. That being said I also have hard but drinkable water and brew at least once a week with it. Although I have not done a comparison all my beers turn out fine. I am among the "if its good enough to drink its good enough to brew crowd". You will be fine either way. Congrats on your first all grain its the best decision you have ever made.

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Old 04-30-2014, 01:12 AM   #4
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I'd go with bottled water.

I have the same issues. I get a lot of buildup on all my appliances, faucets, and showers. I generally use 1/2 distilled water and 1/2 tap water, some acid malt, campden tablets, and an RV water filter. It's a lot of work, but it's worked so far - although, I haven't done anything really light yet.

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Old 04-30-2014, 01:41 AM   #5
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So the 1 Gal jugs of spring water should be fine than, I'm brewing the popular Pale Ale recipe found on this forum.

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Old 04-30-2014, 09:22 PM   #6
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Hard water is not an impediment to brewing! The main thing you need to worry about is the alkalinity. Your water probably does have high alkalinity and that will screw up your brewing. You are on the right track...find out what is in your water first. Then you can plan what treatment and adjustment it needs. If it is really poor water, then you might need to move to RO or distilled water.

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Old 05-01-2014, 12:00 AM   #7
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If my tap water was any harder, it could be advertised as a calcium supplement. I don't have any problems brewing most styles with it. It may not be "optimal" but it isn't "bad".

There are certain ones I don't though. Such as: I brew Dorts instead if Pilsners.

Unless you are doing something that demands really soft water (like a pilsner) try your house water first before you decide you have to spend $10 on water for every 5 gallons of beer you brew.

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Old 05-01-2014, 07:43 PM   #8
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There are lots of things you might do but in the blind you might as well brew with what you have.

Spring water is equally a pig in a poke though often the mineral content will be listed on the bottle. If you know how to read that listing you can do (or not do) some things to improve the beer. The best bet would probably be to get some jugs of RO water rather than spring water, add 5 grams (1 tsp) of calcium chloride to each 5 gal and just brew with that.

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Old 05-01-2014, 07:52 PM   #9
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It depends on what you are going to brew. You can buy bottled spring water to be safe or if it is a darker non-hoppy beer you can use half tap and half distilled. Also if you have chloramines in your water, you might be safe and use some campden or vitamin c. I live in Houston, we have pretty hard water and I have brewed with non-treated tap water before (several times) and did not have problems, but I do not brew too many hoppy or thin/dry beers.

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Old 05-02-2014, 01:41 AM   #10
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The guy at my lhbs who grew up where I live and is familiar with our city water suggested mixing 5 gal of RO with 5 gal of my tap water. He said the RO would help neutralize some of the over abundance of minerals in the hard tap water. I may try that in the future just to try and c what happens.

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