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Old 12-03-2011, 12:14 PM   #1
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Default Help switching from bottle to tap H2O

I'd like some help with switching from bottled spring water to brewing with my tap water. It is great tasting and nationally recognized as some of the best water in the country.

I'm curious if I should filter, and what additions, if any, I should make for a basic all-grain IPA, for example.

These are the 2010 averages:

Alkalinity mg/L 9.9
Calcium mg/L 1.3
Conductivity uS/cm 5 3
Hardness (total) mg/L 5.3
Magnesium mg/L 0.51
Potassium mg/L 0.79
Phosphate (total) mg/L 0.94
**Ammonia (total) mg/L 0.55
Sodium mg/L 8.1

It is treated with an average of 2ppm of chloramine 11 months out of the year, and chlorine (1.9ppm) for one month in the spring (March).

Thanks.

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Old 12-03-2011, 12:29 PM   #2
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See http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f128/jus...stions-284861/

That poster has a similar situation.

One thing not mentioned in that thread is the chloramine. You will need approximately 1 Campden tablet per 20 gallons treated to get rid of it.

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Old 12-03-2011, 12:44 PM   #3
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I sometimes treat for chloramine, but I've been worrying about it less lately.

Potassium (or sodium) metabisulfite is an easier way to treat than campden tablets. It is the same stuff in powdered form. I find it easier to measure the trace amounts you'll need for the average batch of beer.

It's really cheap, too. I remove chloramine and chlorine from my seltzer keg with it, and I've barely used 1/3 of a 2 dollar bag over 10-15 kegs of water (plus brewing).

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Old 12-03-2011, 02:29 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajdelange View Post
See http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f128/jus...stions-284861/

That poster has a similar situation.

One thing not mentioned in that thread is the chloramine. You will need approximately 1 Campden tablet per 20 gallons treated to get rid of it.
I read that thread and just got more confused. The primer is helpful, but I'm not sure I know enough to know what my report is telling me. Is my water SUPER soft (5.3mg/L "Total Hardness")? I don't have separate chloride or sulfate measurements, only a total hardness.

I picked up some potassium metabisulfite to treat for the chloramine, and some gypsum. Sounds like I need calcium chloride instead of (or in addition to) the gypsum?
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Old 12-03-2011, 08:47 PM   #5
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Either powder or the tablets will work fine. Whether you decide one is handier than the other or not is up to you. The tablets are, IMO, a little handier because they are premeasured. If you are treating 10 gallons, use a half of one, 5 gallons a quarter etc. No need to be that accurate. Crush the tablet in the bottom of a glass and dissolve in a little water. Add bits of the mix until the smell of chlorine is gone.

Consider your water devoid of minerals - i.e. super soft. You don't need calcium beyond the little bit that is in your water but it often a good idea to have some. The first choice is usually calcium chloride because it doesn't emphasize hops and some people don't like sulfate. But some do. So yes, you should have some chloride. But if you want to push hops you should get most of the calcium from calcium sulfate.

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