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Old 09-27-2012, 03:44 PM   #11
Hamsterbite
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Wow...same time.

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Old 09-27-2012, 03:53 PM   #12
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I'm sure it does and lots of other strange stuff goes on in the kettle too. For example consider pressure. A foot of wort exerts a pressure of half a pound per square inch on the bottom of the kettle (1/30th of an atmosphere). This is enough to raise the boiling point there by almost 1 °C.

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Old 09-27-2012, 04:45 PM   #13
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Following the wiki trail, it looks like Critical Heat Flux (CHF) is part of the phenomenon I'm interested in. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Critical_heat_flux

Interesting stuff. This may explain why my brew pot sometimes gets a caramel stain on the bottom in the shape of my burner. This is apparently happening in the absense of direct contact with the water. Instinct told me that a kettle wouldn't scorch that was in contact with water, so it was a bit of a mystery. Turns out, the reason it scorches, is that the water is seperated by a film of steam when input temps reaches a certain (condition variable) point.
It may also explain how sometimes just as a boil starts to roll, it can fall back down and cycle despite the heat source remaining constant. Once that film develops, heat transfer is reduced. I can certainly see why having a wide pattern burner is advantageous.

__________________

Sometimes the angels punish us by answering our prayers. -Peart

Next Brew: SWMBO's choice. Probably Saison.
Primary: Janet's Brown, Mulled Chamomile Cider/Perry
Secondary: Nada
Bottle Conditioning: Nada
Bottled and Ready: Hop in the Dark, Raison Detre, Hoppy Saison

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