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Old 04-06-2009, 04:25 AM   #1
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Default Fermentation and Monosaccharide/Disaccharides

Do any type mono/di-saccharides ferment or are metabolized well by yeasts?

Could someone link me to an article that can describe what type of saccharides ferments the best? And what to expect by each one?

At the bottom of the wiki article for sucrose : Sucrose - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia is a chart about the multiple types of saccharides, and I was wondering what kind of mixtures between the di and monos could create a new type of flavor and fermentable.

Thanks in advance!

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Old 04-07-2009, 07:49 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by digdan View Post
Do any type mono/di-saccharides ferment or are metabolized well by yeasts?

Could someone link me to an article that can describe what type of saccharides ferments the best? And what to expect by each one?

At the bottom of the wiki article for sucrose : Sucrose - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia is a chart about the multiple types of saccharides, and I was wondering what kind of mixtures between the di and monos could create a new type of flavor and fermentable.

Thanks in advance!
It's not just any disaccharide. The di- and trisaccharides that a yeast can metabolize depends on the enzymes it has, its transport proteins, and the environment that the yeast is in. For example, some yeast can hydrolyze lactose into monosaccharides for metabolism, but some can't because they lack lactase. Our beer yeast have a transport protein for maltose that brings a maltose molecule inside the cell where it is hydrolyzed by alpha-glucosidase. Sucrose can either be transported inside and hydrolyzed, or it will self-hydrolyze in an acidic environment before being transported and metabolized.

Most of the "flavor" that comes from wort sugars are just those that do not get fermented. Obviously, this would be like maltotetraose or lactose for beer yeast. You can read about the uses of different sugars here.
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Old 04-08-2009, 10:45 AM   #3
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You can read about the uses of different sugars here.
Quote:
table sugar is completely fermentable and will contribute no flavor at all to your beer.
This is not true, and has been proven so.

Quote:
It also adds a little body and contributes to head retention, and many homebrewers I know will add about 250g of malto-dextrin to every beer they brew for these reasons alone.
This leads me to believe the author has no idea how to make a good beer.

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Brown sugar is simply cane syrup that has been incompletely refined.
More often than not, this is not true, and you really can't tell by the package. Brown sugar now usually has molasses added back to it after it has been completely refined.

A lot of what is said is correct, but when I start seeing things like the second one I quoted, I usually stop reading as I have lost faith that this person knows what they are talking about.

Last edited by z987k; 04-08-2009 at 10:48 AM.
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Old 04-09-2009, 02:08 AM   #4
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Well, I can't attest to Sucrose adding any flavor, but I will tell you that it is most certainly fermentable by CERTAIN strains of S.cerevisiae. In fact, in most scientific studies, sucrose (along with glucose) are some of the more prevalent sugars used for fermentations of petroleum and hair care products.

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Old 04-09-2009, 02:56 AM   #5
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Well, I can't attest to Sucrose adding any flavor, but I will tell you that it is most certainly fermentable by CERTAIN strains of S.cerevisiae. In fact, in most scientific studies, sucrose (along with glucose) are some of the more prevalent sugars used for fermentations of petroleum and hair care products.
It's not the sugar itself that imparts the flavor, rather when it is overused, well first obviously you get thin beer, but also since the yeast have to use their own invertase, it'll throw some off flavors in there.
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Old 04-09-2009, 03:58 AM   #6
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When I ferment with sugars I get a "cider" flavor. Hard to describe except for "cider" flavor.

I'm ultimately trying to find new base saccharides to use for experimental fermentation.

Lets say Mikes Hard Lemonade per say. What sugar do they use to create the base alcoholic mixture in that?

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Old 04-09-2009, 04:31 AM   #7
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When I ferment with sugars I get a "cider" flavor. Hard to describe except for "cider" flavor.

I'm ultimately trying to find new base saccharides to use for experimental fermentation.

Lets say Mikes Hard Lemonade per say. What sugar do they use to create the base alcoholic mixture in that?
you're simply using too much.

you could also try making you're own candy sugar though. Just takes table sugar, a stove and a bit of acid (lemon juice.. cream of tartar)
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Old 04-09-2009, 02:41 PM   #8
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That is inverted sugar right?

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Old 04-10-2009, 03:10 PM   #9
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Here is an article that lists the carbohydrates that are of importance for brewing:

Carbohydrates - German Brewing Techniques

Kai

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Old 04-10-2009, 03:29 PM   #10
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wait a minute, are ya'll saying that not all that i read on the intrweb is true!?

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