Kegconnection Complete Starter Kit and More Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Brew Science > Fermentability of Grains

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 10-25-2009, 09:34 PM   #1
BackAlleyBrewingCo
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Toledo, OH
Posts: 86
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default Fermentability of Grains

Hi all,

I understand that different grains will contribute a different ratio of fermentable to non-fermentable sugars, from the very fermentable (base malts) to the mostly unfermentable (darker specialty malts.) Is there any way to estimate the fermentable/unfermentable contributions of different grains? It would seem like very useful information for developing recipes, but I've never seen it listed anywhere.

Thanks,

TD

__________________
BackAlleyBrewingCo is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-25-2009, 09:53 PM   #2
VTBrewer
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: South Burlington, VT
Posts: 847
Liked 5 Times on 5 Posts

Default

Its called PPG (points per pound per gallon). It's how much each grain will add to your gravity. Just about every vendor that you buy from lists the PPG fo the grain, and its the fundamental unit used for predicted gravity when making a recipe.

__________________
  • Fermenting: Cherry Stout
  • On Tap: Town Hall Hope & King Scotch Ale, Red Hook ESB

Recipes And Blogs: ClubHomeBrew
VTBrewer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-25-2009, 10:17 PM   #3
BackAlleyBrewingCo
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Toledo, OH
Posts: 86
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by VTBrewer View Post
Its called PPG (points per pound per gallon). It's how much each grain will add to your gravity. Just about every vendor that you buy from lists the PPG fo the grain, and its the fundamental unit used for predicted gravity when making a recipe.
Thanks for the reply, but that's not what I'm looking for. PPG gives the extract potential of all sugars, it doesn't tell us anything about how much of the sugar is fermentable. Sorry if my question was unclear.
__________________
In Primary:
Aging: Tripel
Drinking: Maibock Ale, Amarillo IPA, Irish Red

Last edited by BackAlleyBrewingCo; 10-25-2009 at 10:35 PM.
BackAlleyBrewingCo is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-26-2009, 04:21 PM   #4
Scimmia
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: QCA, Iowa
Posts: 959
Liked 5 Times on 5 Posts

Default

Depends too much on enzymatic conditions during the mash. You can very easily change the fermemtability of the sugars by just mashing a few degrees higher/lower.

__________________
Scimmia is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-26-2009, 05:34 PM   #5
david_42
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
david_42's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Willamina & Oak Grove, Oregon, USA
Posts: 25,651
Liked 133 Times on 126 Posts

Default

You can get a good idea by comparing the steeping PPG to the mashing PPG. Starches don't dissolve very well.

__________________

Remember one unassailable statistic, as explained by the late, great George Carlin: "Just think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of them are even stupider!"

"I would like to die on Mars, just not on impact." Elon Musk

david_42 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-17-2012, 04:01 PM   #6
501irishred
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
501irishred's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Benton, Arkansas
Posts: 1,235
Liked 121 Times on 98 Posts
Likes Given: 29

Default

Bump.....

This is a question that I've tried to get answered for the longest. Who knows - maybe something has changed since 2009! Of course the one reply about mash temps is valid, however there is bound to be a standard that is used, like with PPG and yield%.

__________________
501irishred is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-17-2012, 04:40 PM   #7
WoodlandBrew
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
WoodlandBrew's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Malden, MA
Posts: 1,740
Liked 123 Times on 120 Posts
Likes Given: 57

Default

I did a post on this recently. Most grains all ferment the same whether it is base malt, crystal or dark roast. What will effect the fermentability of the wort is lactose or sucrose.

http://woodlandbrew.blogspot.com/2012/12/final-gravity-in-recipe-formulation.html

__________________

The 2nd edition is now available: Brewing Engineering
BLOG: Brewing Boiled Down Brewing science for those of us without a Ph.D

WoodlandBrew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-18-2012, 01:22 AM   #8
501irishred
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
501irishred's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Benton, Arkansas
Posts: 1,235
Liked 121 Times on 98 Posts
Likes Given: 29

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by WoodlandBrew View Post
I did a post on this recently. Most grains all ferment the same whether it is base malt, crystal or dark roast. What will effect the fermentability of the wort is lactose or sucrose.

http://woodlandbrew.blogspot.com/2012/12/final-gravity-in-recipe-formulation.html

Thanks, and nice write up! Admittedly it was when trying to add lactose to a recipe in BeerSmith that got me wondering since it simply adds it as a standard fermentable grain. I knew that lactose is "mostly" unfermentable as described in the chart you linked (I use the same one) , but still wonder about the specifics. In the same ilk, I would have to say that a crystal 120 has more unfermentables than 2 row base malt, but how much...? In each case, I fully agree that it's not enough to matter, but the anal-itical side wonders it the info exists somewhere. Oh well, in the mean time I think I'll RAHAHB..........
__________________
501irishred is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-18-2012, 04:34 AM   #9
WoodlandBrew
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
WoodlandBrew's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Malden, MA
Posts: 1,740
Liked 123 Times on 120 Posts
Likes Given: 57

Default

There was a thread about it on HBT here. Excel charts and everything. I also have a post on my blog about it back in October I think. Bottom line, it's not going to change your fg by even one point, so all the other processes variation effects it much more than the fermentability of the crystal.

__________________

The 2nd edition is now available: Brewing Engineering
BLOG: Brewing Boiled Down Brewing science for those of us without a Ph.D

WoodlandBrew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-18-2012, 05:34 AM   #10
501irishred
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
501irishred's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Benton, Arkansas
Posts: 1,235
Liked 121 Times on 98 Posts
Likes Given: 29

Default

Sounds good, although I do like a good Excel spreadsheet occasionally.

Thanks for the help and insight!

__________________
501irishred is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Fermentability issues w/ AG batches GIusedtoBe All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 6 09-30-2008 04:15 AM
Fermentability of Honey mew Mead Forum 4 01-21-2007 03:25 AM
Caramelisation vs. Fermentability Shambolic Extract Brewing 2 06-26-2006 01:40 AM
Great fermentability (from 1.084 to 1.010!) Steve973 All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 9 04-06-2006 02:15 PM
DME / LME Fermentability ScottT Extract Brewing 0 08-31-2005 07:00 PM