Home Brew Forums

Home Brew Forums (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/forum.php)
-   Brew Science (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f128/)
-   -   EZ Water Adjustment spreadsheet (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f128/ez-water-adjustment-spreadsheet-135095/)

-TH- 09-03-2009 04:29 PM

EZ Water Adjustment spreadsheet
 
Go here to download the spreadsheet:
www.EZWaterCalculator.com
Version 1.7 (2-26-10)

Instructions:

Step 1: Enter your starting water profile, mash & sparge volumes, and dilution rate (if any).

Step 2: Examine the results.
1) Residual Alkalinity (RA) - See if the corresponding color range (SRM) matches the beer you are brewing. If not, the RA will need to be adjusted in order for the mash to be at the proper pH.
2) Chloride to Sulfate Ratio - Determine if this needs to be adjusted in order to match the style/flavor of your beer.
3) Individual Mineral Levels - Take note of which mineral levels need to be adjusted in order to fall within the recommended ranges shown. Alternatively you can try to match these levels to a particular region or other set of guidelines.
Step 3: Modify the results by making salt additions. The goal here is to get: 1) The RA to coincide with your recipe color, 2) The chloride to sulfate ratio to a desired flavored profile, and 3) The individual mineral levels to within recommended ranges.

Notes:

Add mash salts directly to the mash. Add sparge salts directly to the boil (not the sparge). You may choose not to add certain salts to the sparge water in order to keep some minerals lower in the total water (sodium for example). In this case, simply uncheck the appropriate box.

For an excellent video series about adjusting water using this spreadsheet (courtesy Bobby M), go here: Water Modification Videos, TH's Spreadsheet

For more information about how this works and why, I highly recommend reading John Palmer's entire chapter on water found here:
http://www.howtobrew.com/section3/chapter15.html

Source: The recommended mineral ranges, RA to SRM recommendations, and Cl to SO4 ratio recommendations are all based on John Palmer's RA spreadsheet and pH nomograph.

EuBrew 09-03-2009 04:40 PM

So far this seems much easier to manage. One question, my water report does not have bicarbonate listed. It has total alkalinity (CACO3), Noncarbonate hardness (CACO3), and total hardness (CACO3). Which of these values do I plug into the bicarbonate level?

-TH- 09-03-2009 04:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by EuBrew (Post 1524760)
So far this seems much easier to manage. One question, my water report does not have bicarbonate listed. It has total alkalinity (CACO3), Noncarbonate hardness (CACO3), and total hardness (CACO3). Which of these values do I plug into the bicarbonate level?

Alkalinity. I'll note that on the spreadsheet.

EuBrew 09-03-2009 04:46 PM

great resource, thanks for the work!!

Schnitzengiggle 09-03-2009 06:09 PM

Sweet spreadsheet, much more simplified than Palmer's. Nicely done!:mug:

The Pol 09-03-2009 06:11 PM

I use Brewater 3.0... it is fully automatic

It only asks for your starting water profile...

Then asks for your target water profile (it has a library of just about any profile you can imagine)

Once you select your target, you let it compute your salt additions itself. No trial and error... it will give you the salt amounts in grams or in tsp.

The only thing you have to do is tell it your starting water profile, then choose one of the many target water profiles... bam, it is done. I am personally not a big fan of slide rule type calculators.

Nice work though.

wildwest450 09-03-2009 06:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The Pol (Post 1525063)
I use Brewater 3.0... it is fully automatic

It won't run in Vista.:(

SpanishCastleAle 09-03-2009 07:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by -TH- (Post 1524775)
Alkalinity. I'll note that on the spreadsheet.

But the Bicarbonate number and the CaCO3 number are not the same. Close but not the same number. I've never even tried a conversion between them so I don't know what it is.

-TH- 09-03-2009 07:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SpanishCastleAle (Post 1525284)
But the Bicarbonate number and the CaCO3 number are not the same. Close but not the same number. I've never even tried a conversion between them so I don't know what it is.

This is what I had noted on the spreadsheet:
Bicarbonate (HCO3) = Alkalinity
as CaCO3 x 60 / 52

It was a little unclear because of the text wrap not to mention it should have been 61 / 50.

Now it shows:
Bicarbonate (HCO3) = Alkalinity as CaCO3 x 1.22

Saccharomyces 09-03-2009 07:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SpanishCastleAle (Post 1525284)
But the Bicarbonate number and the CaCO3 number are not the same. Close but not the same number. I've never even tried a conversion between them so I don't know what it is.

The conversion depends on many factors, so the best bet is to get it straight from the report.

If you don't have your alkalinity, but you have total hardness, using the total hardness number is probably close enough. We are making beer, not atomic weapons. ;)


All times are GMT. The time now is 05:34 AM.

Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.