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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Brew Science > Evidence (via studies) behind step mashing
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Old 12-06-2012, 05:32 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobby_M View Post
http://braukaiser.com/wiki/index.php...rch_Conversion

Is there any particular reason that you're suspect of the concept? Do a very simple controlled experiment yourself by mashing some 2 row at 148 and then 158, ferment with equal yeast at typical pitching rates. Measure final gravity.
That was a good read. I need to go over it later in more detail.

I like those charts.

See... not everyone is a chemist. Humans aren't born with a full understanding of the starch conversion process.
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Old 12-06-2012, 07:39 PM   #12
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Why not apply the scientific method? You've asked a question, done some research, now make a hypothesis, do the experiment suggested above, and draw a conclusion for yourself on your system. Science in action!

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Old 12-06-2012, 07:54 PM   #13
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Yeah I guess I understand because you're a new brewer that you are skeptical of some of the advice or "wisdom" you see here and other places on the internet.

However, if you've brewed a few similar AG batches mashed at various temps, it is easy to see how the temperature affects the beer that is produced. Higher mash temps will give you a less fermentable wort and fuller-bodied, and sweeter beer, and lower temperatures will give you a more fermentable wort and thinner-bodied, drier beer. My guess is that this question is connected to your recent electric turkey roaster purchase, which you have probably discovered doesn't do well at maintaining mash temps in the range you'd like.

There is about a metric ton of science behind this knowledge. It is so well understood that it is in the introductory chapters of most brewing texts.

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Old 12-11-2012, 05:33 PM   #14
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[QUOTE=ryno1ryno;4654733]All Grain mashing requires the varying temperature schedules? I want to know if there is actual scientific evidence available that proves that different water temps actually do cause the sugars and enzymes to behave and coagulate differently.
QUOTE]

This is the work I have done: http://braukaiser.com/wiki/index.php...fusion_mashing

And there is more in the literature as noted above. Thanks for referencing my site.

But I need to get a clarification on your question. Are you asking for the need of a mash schedule that varies the temperature or the need of having to adjust the temperature of an isothermal mash?

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Old 12-12-2012, 02:16 AM   #15
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Quote:
But I need to get a clarification on your question. Are you asking for the need of a mash schedule that varies the temperature or the need of having to adjust the temperature of an isothermal mash?
First part yes. Second part... huh? I have no idea what isothermal mash is

Essentially... how important is steeping at lower temps and then changing temps. If there is a quick and dirty answer then I'm happy. I do like the material and I believe I get it now... but it never hurts to be lazy and have someone else tell me what they think.
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Old 12-12-2012, 02:22 AM   #16
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Have you read any brewing literature yet? The question I believe you are asking IS proven science. You're not questioning something like a secondary or using glass as opposed to plastic. Enzymes activate within specific temperature ranges, there's no question about that.

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Old 12-12-2012, 02:25 AM   #17
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I am not questioning anything at the moment. I read the material and it was great.

He asked me to clarify my question.

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Old 12-12-2012, 02:31 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ryno1ryno View Post
First part yes. Second part... huh? I have no idea what isothermal mash is

Essentially... how important is steeping at lower temps and then changing temps. If there is a quick and dirty answer then I'm happy. I do like the material and I believe I get it now... but it never hurts to be lazy and have someone else tell me what they think.
While I applaud your inquisitiveness and your thirst for knowledge, sometimes questions like this (while still doing Mr. Beer and no practical knowledge of all-grain) seem to be trolling for trolling's sake.

There are literally hundreds and hundreds of brewing texts, some simple (like how to brew.com) and some not (Fix).

The short answer to your question is "yes", that there are tons of texts that point to the fact that "proves that different water temps actually do cause the sugars and enzymes to behave and coagulate differently."

You don't have to read them all, but if you read one, you'll have a good understanding of the principals of the science of mashing.

And then saying:

"In this thread... opinions don't count. :-)"
is really ridiculous. You have 0 basis for YOUR premise, but you're asking some noted brewers, and brewing scientists to prove that you don't know what you're talking about! C'mon. You're in the "Brew Science" forum. Not the "beginner's forum". To post that way, with such a chip on your shoulder, to noted brewing scientists is somewhat presumptuous.

I don't go into a "Advance Physics" forum and ask them to explain force and gravity!

Some of this is Brewing 101 basics.
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Old 12-12-2012, 02:56 AM   #19
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See replies #10 and #11.

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Old 12-12-2012, 02:59 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ryno1ryno View Post
See replies #10 and #11.
Yes. See the forum posted in. (Brew Science)

AJ deLange (noted brewing water chemistry expert) answered you:

Quote:
Originally Posted by ajdelange View Post
In my opinion the best place to start would be with the bibliographies/references in some of the well known brewing texts such as B,H,S&Y.
That was nice of him to answer. If you know what texts he's talking about, you're ahead of the game.
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