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Old 05-16-2009, 08:12 PM   #1
ipscman
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Default Crud floating in boil kettle

AG brewer.

I see two phases of crud (pre-hop addition) developing on top of the boil. First is dark brown. I believe it is primarily polyphenols and protein coagulating. I probably scoop out 2 full cups of that. It seems a bit oily as well which I assume means I'm getting rid of excess lipids.

Secondarily, I see white grunge.

Question: Can anyone tell me what makes-up each of these developments?

RE lipids (?). I always have good fermentations so this doesn't seem to be a problem. I assume that removing this excess helps with foam development and head retention.

???

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Old 05-17-2009, 02:43 PM   #2
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Hmmm, I've never removed anything from the boil, except maybe a bag of hops at the end. I can't answer any of your questions, I don't know why I'm replying to this except I was wondering why you remove them? It sounds like hot break which IS coagulated protein if that helps any.

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Old 05-17-2009, 04:07 PM   #3
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Default Why bother?

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Originally Posted by COLObrewer View Post
Hmmm, I've never removed anything from the boil, except maybe a bag of hops at the end. I can't answer any of your questions, I don't know why I'm replying to this except I was wondering why you remove them? It sounds like hot break which IS coagulated protein if that helps any.
Very thoughtful of you to respond. The reason for removing this comes from a number of sources. The winner of the California AHA (brewer of the year) does it religiously. It seems the reason has to do with the effect this has on the final product:

1. Chill and permanent haze (removal of polyphenols/tannins, and protein)

2. Foam production and head retention (removal of lipids)

3. Staling byproducts (all of the above contribute to staling in the beer)

4. Taste effect

5. Korzonas (Homebrewing, Vol 1, p. 76) recommends it for better hop utilization, believing that the hot break coats the lupelin glands and restricts the isomerization of the resins.

If you listen to the brewcastingnetwork you'll find that a number of the "experts" remove the above by filtering, believing that all of the above are results of that. For those that don't filter, this is a poor man's approach to removing the same earlier in the process.

We learn together. Thanks for participating.

Happy brewing.
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Old 05-17-2009, 04:13 PM   #4
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This is good to know for future reference if I ever have any of those problems, thanx much. I wonder if water chemistry has a profound effect on any of that, but, everything probably will effect it.

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Old 05-19-2009, 03:51 PM   #5
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I've also read that removing the hot break allows for better hop utilization....something to the effect of the break coating the hop particles. Don't know how much science is there, but it was suggested to get a vigorous boil, remove break, then add bittering hops.

Anyone else come across this recc?

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Old 05-21-2009, 05:48 PM   #6
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Default Hot break coating hops, reducing utilization

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Originally Posted by BuzzCraft View Post
I've also read that removing the hot break allows for better hop utilization....something to the effect of the break coating the hop particles. Don't know how much science is there, but it was suggested to get a vigorous boil, remove break, then add bittering hops.

Anyone else come across this recc?
Yes, I read this in Korzonas (Homebrewing, vol. 1). He believed it to be true based on logic, but had not actually tested the theory.
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