Kegconnection Complete Starter Kit and More Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Brew Science > Can I brew with this water?

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 01-02-2013, 04:46 AM   #1
flyingfinbar
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: long island, new york
Posts: 562
Liked 9 Times on 9 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default Can I brew with this water?

First off, thanks way in advance for any help...I understand that this can be tedious, but I am having no luck trying to decipher the information here into usable knowledge.

I've been brewing all grain with Poland Spring gallon jugs and mineral additions as my brewing water. I'd really like to begin using my tap water to save money/time, if possible. How does this look for a base water?



http://www.massapequawater.com/water_report_2012.pdf

Also, this information is on the site as well:
WHAT TYPE OF WATER TREATMENT

IS USED?
The Massapequa Water District provides treatment at all
wells to improve the quality of the water pumped prior to
distribution to the consumer. The pH of the pumped water
is adjusted upward to reduce the corrosive action between
the water and water mains and in-house plumbing by the
addition of sodium hydroxide. To provide optimum
corrosion control, the Water District also adds blended
polyphosphates to the water produced at each well site.
This product will sequester the oxidation of metals such
as iron (see section below) and provide a passivating film
on the interior surfaces of ferrous iron and copper piping
to mitigate the potential leaching of lead and copper. It
should be noted that all water treatment chemicals used
by the District comply ANSI/NSF Standard 60. This
standard is the accepted health-effect standard for
drinking water additives. The District is also required to
chlorinate the water supply with small amounts of chlorine.

waterreport.jpg  
__________________
flyingfinbar is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-02-2013, 11:54 AM   #2
Kaiser
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Kaiser's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Pepperell, MA
Posts: 3,904
Liked 114 Times on 71 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

The iron level might be of a concern but it doesn't seem to be excessively high. Does the water have a metallic taste?

Otherwise the water appears to have generally low levels of the minerals that we care about in brewing. You should add salts to this water for brewing.

Alkalinity is missing from the analysis, but I assume that it will be fairly low given the low amount of metal ions.

Kai

Kaiser is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-02-2013, 03:02 PM   #3
flyingfinbar
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: long island, new york
Posts: 562
Liked 9 Times on 9 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaiser
The iron level might be of a concern but it doesn't seem to be excessively high. Does the water have a metallic taste?

Otherwise the water appears to have generally low levels of the minerals that we care about in brewing. You should add salts to this water for brewing.

Alkalinity is missing from the analysis, but I assume that it will be fairly low given the low amount of metal ions.

Kai
According to the little write up, it says they adjust the pH upward using sodium hydroxide to reduce interaction with the pipes. Is this a problem? Also, with regard to the iron levels, is there anything I could do about that? The water generally doesn't have a metallic taste, as far as I can tell.

The write up says they use chlorine, could I counteract this with a small carbon filter?

Thanks so much for the help!
__________________
flyingfinbar is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-02-2013, 03:05 PM   #4
Jayhem
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Culpeper, VA
Posts: 2,566
Liked 254 Times on 206 Posts
Likes Given: 1163

Default

You need at least 50 mg/l of Calcium for good yeast growth. Definitely looks like you need to run your report through https://sites.google.com/site/brunwater/ And decide which salts and/or acid need to be added for good mash PH and yeast health.

Since your PH is unknown you would probably have to assume that city water is kept toward a neutral pH (7.0) and you need your mash to run in the 5.2-5.4 pH range. That brun spreadsheet is awesome for figuring this out but it is quite extensive and may seem overwhelming but just follow the directions on it and enter your data.

__________________

Next up: American Brown Ale
Primary 1&2:
Primary 3&4:
Bottle Conditioning/drinking: Summer Kolsch, White Zombie (Amarillo IPA), English Pale Ale (ESB)

Jayhem is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-02-2013, 03:14 PM   #5
flyingfinbar
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: long island, new york
Posts: 562
Liked 9 Times on 9 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jayhem
You need at least 50 mg/l of Calcium for good yeast growth. Definitely looks like you need to run your report through https://sites.google.com/site/brunwater/ And decide which salts and/or acid need to be added for good mash PH and yeast health.

Since your PH is unknown you would probably have to assume that city water is kept toward a neutral pH (7.0) and you need your mash to run in the 5.2-5.4 pH range. That brun spreadsheet is awesome for figuring this out but it is quite extensive and may seem overwhelming but just follow the directions on it and enter your data.
Cool, thanks. Since some of the values given vary pretty wildly, do I just aim for the the middle when entering my numbers?
__________________
flyingfinbar is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-02-2013, 03:40 PM   #6
Jayhem
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Culpeper, VA
Posts: 2,566
Liked 254 Times on 206 Posts
Likes Given: 1163

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingfinbar View Post
Cool, thanks. Since some of the values given vary pretty wildly, do I just aim for the the middle when entering my numbers?
That's what I would do. Not sure how versed you are on your chemistry but the cation/anion ratios must be pretty close to equal so you have to balance that out first on the input tab of the brunwater spreadsheet. You will likely have to make some assumptions since that report is not complete for water chemistry.
__________________

Next up: American Brown Ale
Primary 1&2:
Primary 3&4:
Bottle Conditioning/drinking: Summer Kolsch, White Zombie (Amarillo IPA), English Pale Ale (ESB)

Jayhem is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-02-2013, 03:46 PM   #7
flyingfinbar
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: long island, new york
Posts: 562
Liked 9 Times on 9 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jayhem

That's what I would do. Not sure how versed you are on your chemistry but the cation/anion ratios must be pretty close to equal so you have to balance that out first on the input tab of the brunwater spreadsheet. You will likely have to make some assumptions since that report is not complete for water chemistry.
I think a chimpanzee would likely have a better knowledge of chemistry than myself at the moment...though I am trying!
__________________
flyingfinbar is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-02-2013, 04:12 PM   #8
Kaiser
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Kaiser's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Pepperell, MA
Posts: 3,904
Liked 114 Times on 71 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingfinbar View Post
According to the little write up, it says they adjust the pH upward using sodium hydroxide to reduce interaction with the pipes. Is this a problem?
No that's not a problem and a fairly common treatment. Since the water likely has low alkalinity it doesn't take much to raise the pH. It would be nice to see the alkalinity number, though.


Quote:
Also, with regard to the iron levels, is there anything I could do about that? The water generally doesn't have a metallic taste, as far as I can tell.
At this point I'd keep an eye, or better yet a taste bud, on it. If it doesn't show up as a problem you don't have to fix it.

Quote:
The write up says they use chlorine, could I counteract this with a small carbon filter?
yes, that would help. Make sure that the filtered water as no residual chlorine smell or taste.

Here is some additional info about water reports: http://braukaiser.com/wiki/index.php...a_water_report

Kai
__________________
BrauKaiser.com - brewing science blog - Twitter - water and mash chemistry calculator
Kaiser is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-02-2013, 07:13 PM   #9
flyingfinbar
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: long island, new york
Posts: 562
Liked 9 Times on 9 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default

Ok, I just emailed the water district asking for alkalinity, pH, and total hardness of the water.

I am, however, worried about the iron levels. I'm researching, aka reading that article you kindly posted, and am seeing a huge potential problem with the iron levels that may be present.

Thanks again, Kai and Jayhem.

__________________
flyingfinbar is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-02-2013, 07:21 PM   #10
brewtime
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
brewtime's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: sykesville md
Posts: 291
Liked 14 Times on 9 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingfinbar View Post
Ok, I just emailed the water district asking for alkalinity, pH, and total hardness of the water.

I am, however, worried about the iron levels. I'm researching, aka reading that article you kindly posted, and am seeing a huge potential problem with the iron levels that may be present.

Thanks again, Kai and Jayhem.
Do youself a favor and purchace the brewers water analysis from Wards Lab the cost is reasonable they send you a container and prepaid postage and you get your results emailed to you. Then once you get your results plug it into Bru'n water
__________________
brewtime is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
using tap water or bottled water to brew ethangray19 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 24 11-13-2013 09:12 PM
Well water @ 215 ppm... Brew with it? cannman Recipes/Ingredients 3 05-20-2012 09:24 PM
Water, water everywhere, and not a drop I can use in my brew. carloski44 Brew Science 9 05-27-2011 07:17 PM
Water, Water and not a drop to brew with 3 Dog Brew All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 16 11-22-2009 04:30 PM
Backpacking water filter for brew water? Talloak General Beer Discussion 10 05-26-2009 11:14 PM