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Old 06-27-2013, 05:13 PM   #651
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Old 06-28-2013, 01:07 PM   #652
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zach1288
My tap water is pretty bad so I want to try using distilled water. I'm going to brew the Centennial Blonde recipe on this website, so it's pretty light.

If i'm using Beersmith it's telling me to mash in with 2.81 gallons of water and batch sparge with 5.76 gallons. So how much Calcium Chloride do I add to the mash? Also do I need to add any acidulated malt?

Thanks,
Zach
The amount of additive you use depends on your grain bill. You want a mash ph of between 5.2 and 5.6. Darker grains are more acidic. I use something called EZ water calc. It's an excel file that let's you enter your grain bill and adjust water ratio and additive amounts until you hit your target ph. It will also tell you how your chloride to sulfate ratio will effect your final flavor (bitter, malty, or balanced). I've found it to be very accurate at predicting mash ph and my efficiency is usually in the 90's. Good luck.


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Old 06-28-2013, 01:36 PM   #653
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It will also tell you how your chloride to sulfate ratio will effect your final flavor (bitter, malty, or balanced).
It won't do that because this is controlled by hop cultivar selection, grain bill choices, and hopping schedules. Sulfate has an effect on how rought/harsh/dry hops perception is and chloride enhances body, sweetness and roundness. That the ratio is a control parameter is a misconception that stubbornly refuses to go away.

I do malty beers, balanced beers and hoppy beers all with the same chloride to sulfate ratio: ∞
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Old 06-29-2013, 08:11 PM   #654
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Just got my first water report - can anybody chime in on this? It seems like hard water, and I wanted to brew a light Kolsch, so not sure I have the right stuff here. ANY advice is helpful, thanks!!!


Calcium 59
Magnesium 15
Sodium 10
Chloride 24
Sulfate 24
Alkalinity (CaCO3 ppm) 163

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Old 06-29-2013, 09:01 PM   #655
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As this is the Primer thread the appropriate comment here would be that it needs to be diluted with RO water to the point where it meets the requirements in #1 and then supplemented with minerals as suggested in that post (for a Kölsch half the recommended baseline CaCL2 addition would actually be better).

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Old 07-03-2013, 06:30 AM   #656
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ive been using tap water, getting some tannin issues, and suspect ph is the problem. if i use 100% RO water and add 1 tsp of calcium chloride will this be sufficient to regulate ph and eliminate any issues? basically get a better beer? or should i blend some RO water with tap water (ex. 70/30)? FYI my tap water tastes fine.

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Old 07-03-2013, 06:51 AM   #657
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ive been using tap water, getting some tannin issues, and suspect ph is the problem. if i use 100% RO water and add 1 tsp of calcium chloride will this be sufficient to regulate ph and eliminate any issues? basically get a better beer? or should i blend some RO water with tap water (ex. 70/30)? FYI my tap water tastes fine.
You're more likely to have a better pH with the RO and CaCL, but you may need some alkalinity (for darker beers) or some acid (for lighter beers). Anyways, there's no way we can tell you if 70/30 would be good as we don't know what your water profile is.
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Old 07-03-2013, 03:37 PM   #658
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Originally Posted by afr0byte View Post
You're more likely to have a better pH with the RO and CaCL, but you may need some alkalinity (for darker beers) or some acid (for lighter beers). Anyways, there's no way we can tell you if 70/30 would be good as we don't know what your water profile is.
here is my water report. this is all new, not sure how to treat. all i know is im getting some tannin astringent flavors that i think are a result of high mash ph and high alkalinity.

Alkalinity as CaCO3 (ppm) 110
Calcium (ppm) 21
Magnesium (ppm) 15
pH 8.0
Radon (pCi/L) 198
Silica (ppm) 83
Sodium (ppm) 27
Total Hardness as CaCO3 (ppm) 111
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Old 07-03-2013, 05:01 PM   #659
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As this is the Primer thread the relevant advice would be to dilute with RO until the alkalinity is below about 30 (i.e. 4:1) and then follow the recommendations in Post #1. The astringency could be caused by sulfate/hops so you should find out what the sulfate is. The can be done at modest expense by sending a sample off to Ward labs. You will also want to know the chloride level because doing the dilution is only one approach - the Primer approach. The Ward Labs report will tell you that too.

With respect to a source of RO water: one approach to that is to install and RO system in your brewery. By I note that your silica is quite high. This can gum up RO membranes and they may, therefore, have shorter life in your installation than in others. The supplier I got my system from expressed great concern at my silica level of 28 mg/L which is at the upper limit of the expected range. You are more than 3 times that. I have never had problems with short membrane life but at the levels you are running it might be of concern.

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Old 07-03-2013, 06:32 PM   #660
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajdelange View Post
As this is the Primer thread the relevant advice would be to dilute with RO until the alkalinity is below about 30 (i.e. 4:1) and then follow the recommendations in Post #1. The astringency could be caused by sulfate/hops so you should find out what the sulfate is. The can be done at modest expense by sending a sample off to Ward labs. You will also want to know the chloride level because doing the dilution is only one approach - the Primer approach. The Ward Labs report will tell you that too.

With respect to a source of RO water: one approach to that is to install and RO system in your brewery. By I note that your silica is quite high. This can gum up RO membranes and they may, therefore, have shorter life in your installation than in others. The supplier I got my system from expressed great concern at my silica level of 28 mg/L which is at the upper limit of the expected range. You are more than 3 times that. I have never had problems with short membrane life but at the levels you are running it might be of concern.
thanks for the advice. how and when do you add calcium chloride? just split 1 tsp between the strike and sparge water and mix it up?


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