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Old 02-21-2013, 10:20 PM   #581
mirogster
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Wheew, that was close one Btw. which one do you have?

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Old 02-22-2013, 07:56 PM   #582
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I use the HM Digital PH-200 Waterproof pH and Temperature Meter. It was recommended by a pro-brewer and personal friend of mine. I am very satisfied. I don't immerse it, however. I will draw out a 2+ ounce sample and put those in narrow plastic taster glasses along with calibration solution and distilled water for rinsing. I do a calibration at the beginning of my session, then measure hot liquor (target 5.0-5.5), mash (target 5.1-5.5), pre-boil and post-boil pH (target 5.2-5.4). Then risne the meter and store it with a little solution on the sponge in the cap.

Got my meter on Amazon, $80 plus shipping. My local hydroponics shop has the calibration solutions.

Cheers!

NanoMan

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Old 02-23-2013, 12:37 PM   #583
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That's the one I have had my eye on......

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Old 02-26-2013, 07:29 PM   #584
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Do it....

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Old 03-12-2013, 01:34 AM   #585
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This could make me simple thing while i'm using the water.If your water tastes good, your beer should taste good. How aspect of brewing could possibly affect to brewing? The addition of salts when brewing with extract is not necessary and also it is not recommended until you have gained experience with the intended recipe.

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Old 03-15-2013, 05:23 PM   #586
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What an excellent thread! I read the entire thing (yes, all 59 pages )

I have one big question though... I've heard that reverse osmosis typically reduces the concentrations of dissolved solids by 90% (ie - water that goes into the RO system with 100ppm of Ca comes out with around 10ppm). If that is true then I probably will still have problems even using straight RO water judging by my Ward Labs report:

pH: 8.0
TDS: 374
Conductivity: 0.62 microSeimens
Cat/An Balance: 6.9/7.3

Na: 40
K: 2
Ca: 90
Mg: 7
TH: 254
NO3-N: 0.4 (1.77 as NO4)
SO4-S: 68 (204 as SO4)
Cl: 35
CO3: 6
HCO3: 115
TA: 104

Needless to say, water heaters don't last long in these here parts...

So, given the mineral content of my water to begin with, would I be better off just using straight RO, or should I still toss in a few grams of calcium chloride?

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Old 03-15-2013, 05:34 PM   #587
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Is this your regular tap water ? If so, it's really ok. Imho, no need to use RO. pH is average for drinking water around the globe, Ca is ok, SO4:Cl favors hoppiness. You can build almost every style with this. Depending on grist of course. I'd use RO only to brew some really delicate Pilseners, Vienna Lagers etc.

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Old 03-15-2013, 05:43 PM   #588
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The water isn't bad, for hoppy styles at least, but he'll need acid for almost all of the beers he brews. That bicarbonate level of 115 is pretty high.

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Old 03-15-2013, 05:55 PM   #589
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True. I have similar water. Without some accidification (accidif. malt, lactic acid, 'bath' salts ), I can't get my mash pH to safe range 5.3-5.6 - even if brewing dark beers (the same concerns sparging water). On the other hand, RO can be used for mentioned sparging.

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Old 03-15-2013, 06:22 PM   #590
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Yep, this is my tap water in (central) Tampa, FL (after passing through a whole-house carbon filter). One interesting fact about our water is that it is blended from 3 separate sources: the Floridan aquifer, the main rivers in Hillsborough Co (Hillsborough & Alafia, plus the Tampa Bypass Canal), and a desalination plant in Tampa Bay.

The problem I've noticed with my first 4 beers is a definite astringent taste with a more subtle soapy taste that lingers after swallowing. From all my reading here, I suspect the problem is simply a matter of alkalinity. So I bought a pH meter (Milwaukee PH55) and the full array of water adjustment chemicals from my LHBS, then loaded up my two otherwise unused Better Bottles with 10gal. of RO water (at $0.25/gal!). I was going to just use RO water with 3 grams of CaCl2, plus a couple grams of CaSO4 for good measure, then adjust the mash pH down to 5.4 with lactic acid if needed, but maybe I should just dilute my tap water in half with RO and keep the lactic acid close by just in case?

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