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Old 03-18-2012, 05:32 AM   #341
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I thought I'd post this as it might interest the followers of this thread. Here are the results of my pH testing of today's brew. Firstly, here is Vancouver's water profile (essentially RO water):
Calcium - 1.4 ppm
Magnesium - 0.2 ppm
Sodium - 1.8 ppm
Sulphate - 1.0 ppm
Chloride - 1.8 ppm
Bicarbonate - 4.6 ppm

Grist

9.25lb Weyermann Pilsner
0.75lb Briess Carapils
14L strike water (straight vancouver tap water - no salt additions)

I mashed in with just the Pilsner, added the Carapils at 25 minutes and used a 55/65/75 mash schedule.

Mash stage, Time, Temperature, Sample Temp, Sample pH, Brix

Strike water 0m 16C 16C 6.9 0Brix
1st Rest 10m 55C 22C 5.5 n/a
1st Rest 15m 55C 18C 5.5 9Brix
2nd Rest 25m 65C 25C 5.5 13Brix
Carapils addition
2nd Rest 30m 61C 25C 5.4 15Brix
2nd Rest 45m 64C 27C 5.4 16Brix
First runnings 11L @ 20Brix

The pH looks pretty good the entire mash and despite being a pale pale yellow, the pH is lower than the black as night dry stout. The dry stout's (from my previous post a few pages ago http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f128/brewing-water-chemistry-primer-198460/index27.html#post3834653) final pH was 4.1. I think its a decent beer but that could just be b/c its St Patricks day.

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Old 03-28-2012, 02:22 PM   #342
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This Primer has been extremely helpful. My water is terrible (Ca 7.7, Mg N/A, Na 170, Cl 13.5, Sulfates 12, alkalinity 437), and I have not been able to make a pale colored beer without off flavors. I feel much more confident now.

One quick question - what would I do for a Belgian Saison? Would I use maybe a tsp of CaCl and Gypsum per 5 gallons of water treated? Specifically, I'm brewing a 100% Brett C. "Saison" and I'm not sure of what sort of water profile I should use.

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Old 03-28-2012, 05:58 PM   #343
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Originally Posted by Clint04 View Post
This Primer has been extremely helpful. My water is terrible (Ca 7.7, Mg N/A, Na 170, Cl 13.5, Sulfates 12, alkalinity 437), and I have not been able to make a pale colored beer without off flavors. I feel much more confident now.

One quick question - what would I do for a Belgian Saison? Would I use maybe a tsp of CaCl and Gypsum per 5 gallons of water treated? Specifically, I'm brewing a 100% Brett C. "Saison" and I'm not sure of what sort of water profile I should use.
Huh, Obviously the Na helps balance the bicarbonates in your water, but that water profile seems quite strange. You must have a lot of magnesium or something. I wouldn't use that water for any beers, personally.

Anyways, for a Saison, I'd just use calcium chloride.
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Old 03-28-2012, 06:43 PM   #344
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Huh, Obviously the Na helps balance the bicarbonates in your water, but that water profile seems quite strange. You must have a lot of magnesium or something. I wouldn't use that water for any beers, personally.

Anyways, for a Saison, I'd just use calcium chloride.
Yep. That water profile is quite strange. I remember the first time I showed it to someone and they said "Wow, you have the worst brewing water I have ever seen." For a while, I was killing myself trying to perfect my brewing process, because I couldn't figure out what I was doing wrong. My very dark beers were turning out well. My pale-colored beers were absolute ****. Then I realized that water does actually play somewhat of a role in beer-making...

I am definitely not using my tap water anymore for brewing, that's for sure. I made my first beer using the baseline method (Roggenbier), and so far it's turning out to be very good. I am excited to try it on a pale beer, like my 100% Brett C. beer I mentioned above.

Thanks for the tip!
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Old 03-29-2012, 12:14 AM   #345
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yooper View Post
By Ajdelange


For British beers: Add 1 tsp gypsum as well as 1 tsp calcium chloride

For very minerally beers (Export, Burton ale): Double the calcium chloride and the gypsum.



.
[/QUOTE]

I've read the thread twice now and I think I have a handle on the whole primer. I am using 100% R/O because my well water, although treated still has too much ferrous Iron(fe-). My only question I have is about the deviation from the primer. For the British Beers I will be adding the tsp of Gypsum to 5 gallons with the tsp of Calcium Chloride included in the primer. Am I correct in my understanding? This is a great thread AJ. All I want to do is make good beer.
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Old 04-02-2012, 06:02 PM   #346
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Thank you for all of the help. I just ordered the ingredients for my next 3 brews. I'm doing an IPA, ESB and american wheat. I brew the IPA all the time so I can't wait to see the difference using distilled water and your suggestions here. If all goes as planned I'll be brewing something next weekend.
I kegged the IPA I brewed a few weeks ago. I normally use us05 yeast but used some washed us04 this time so it's a little different from the normal recipe. I tasted the hydro sample and immediately noticed that it didn't seem as bitter as normal (a good thing). I tasted it again today and it's obviously not ready to drink since it's only been in the fridge and on gas for 1 day but I think it's going to be very good. There is a slight bubblegum taste probably from the us04 yeast. I think the harsh bitterness caused by my crappy well water is gone. I plan to give it until this weekend and it should be carbed and ready to go, but so far so good. I might have to buy an RO system now.
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Old 04-02-2012, 08:31 PM   #347
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For the British Beers I will be adding the tsp of Gypsum to 5 gallons with the tsp of Calcium Chloride included in the primer. Am I correct in my understanding?
Yes.
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Old 04-03-2012, 11:27 AM   #348
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Yes.
Thanks AJ, you have been a big help. Thanks for your primer.
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Old 04-03-2012, 09:11 PM   #349
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I'm just starting to get into water chemistry for brewing and how pH affects it. I don't yet understand it but I'll get there lol

My buddy and I are going to have a brew day soon. He has a Blue Moon clone and I am making a Belgian white beer.

If I am starting with 7 gallons of water (mash in, mash out and sparge) would I use a little less than 1.5tsp of calcium chloride?

What about the 2% sauermalz to the grist? Should I be adding this to the grist or just go with the calcium chloride?

Sorry for the newbie questions. I'm trying to read through all these posts...there are just so many to get through lol

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Old 04-07-2012, 08:05 AM   #350
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Here is another set of water data. This time it is from a gruelling 8 hour Russian Imperial Stout partigyle brew day that pushed the limit of my system. The recipe started as http://barclayperkins.blogspot.ca/2012/02/lets-brew-wednesday-1914-courage.html but when it was scaled up we realized we were short of black malt so it was padded out with some of the 500L bairds chocolate malt. Historic? Probably not perfect but not too far off the mark. Here is the grist (all Baird's)

20lb Maris Otter
5.25lb Brown
1.5lb Black
1lb Chocolate

28L of water and a 60min, 65C single infusion mash. No water treatment, straight up ultra soft, zero carbonate Vancouver tap water. I had intended on adding the 1tsp of CaCl to the mash but it was so thick i didn't think it would dissolve and diffuse so I didn't bother. This was intended to be a traditional 3 gyle partigyle but suffered the worst stuck sparge and ended up having to scoop half the grist out and batch sparging half at time so it turned into the typical homebrewer 1st runnings/second runnings partigyle. Here is the pH data I collected:

Mash stage Time Temperature Sample Temp Sample pH Brix
Strike water 75C 16C 6.9pH 0Brix
1st 15min 64C 23C 5.2pH 17Brix
1st 30min 63C 20C 5.1pH 24Brix

1st runnings 18C 5.2pH 21.5Brix(Pre Boil) 19L@25Brix (Post Boil)
2nd runnings 18C 5.3pH 9Brix(Pre Boil) 22L@10.5(Post Boil)

I'd be really interested in what AJ thinks about the numbers I got. 5.1 pH seems low for a room temp mash reading. If I ever do another classic pale/brown/black porter grist should I consider a chalk addition?

Are these posts interesting? stupid? annoying? Should I put them in a different thread? I put them here because it was this thread that finally motivated me to buy a pH meter and collect some data.

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