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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Brew Science > Boiling to reduce bicarbonates
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Old 03-26-2012, 05:57 PM   #31
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Since you've invoked Le Chatelier, lets not ignore the fact that removing a product also pushes the reaction to the right. That's why it is important to get the CO2 out. If you boil it is sparged out by steam but it is not necessary to boil if you sparge with something else such as air. Another trick that works is to rig a recirculating pump and spray arrangement.

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Old 03-26-2012, 07:33 PM   #32
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Right you are sir about removing the CO2. Thanks for completing the principle.

I wonder if using the pickling lime, if there is a need to boil or maybe just use warm water? With the OH- from the Ca(OH)2 converting the bicarb to carbonates, you would remove all the bicarb and probably precipitate out some extra chalk in the process, right? Maybe just do a quick boil and then add the pickling lime to let sit in an insulated cooler with air circulating from bottom or the spray action you talked about?

Seems like a lot of energy to get out the carbonates by boiling. Your thoughts?

EDIT: I reread your above post, looks like you answered the question on whether you need to boil or not.

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Old 03-26-2012, 08:57 PM   #33
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One of the big advantages of lime treatment (to the pro's anyway) is that no heat is required. In the lime reaction

Ca(OH)2 + Ca++ + 2HCO3- --> 2CaCO3 + 2H2O

as no CO2 is evolved there is no need to sparge it out. However, the solubility of CaCO3 decreases as the temperature is increased so there is a slight advantage to doing lime treatment at higher temperature. Nobody does, AFAIK, so the advantage can't be significant.

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Old 03-26-2012, 09:02 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajdelange View Post
One of the big advantages of lime treatment (to the pro's anyway) i that no heat is required. As in the lime reaction

Ca(OH)2 + Ca++ + 2HCO3- --> 2CaCO3 + 2H2O

As no CO2 is evolved there is no need to sparge it out. However, the solubility of CaCO3 decreases as the temperature is increased so there is a slight advantage to doing lime treatment at higher temperature. Nobody does, AFAIK, so the advantage can't be significant.
Today when I tried my first lime treatment, the water (and pH meter solutions) were all at 66 degrees.
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