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Old 07-02-2010, 04:22 AM   #21
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I'm pretty sure that after three days getting fed 02 on a stir plate, then one day in the fridge doesn't starve my yeast into dormancy.

Also, there are two people replying back on this post, me, mikefromcu and Passedpawn. You are mixing and matching our techniques and approaches.

You won't find "80" any where in my posts. Before you start to try and pick a fight (So you would rather...) read more closely. I'm only here trying to help.

The advice and the technique I used was the advice I got directly from White Labs. You think I goofed? Come try my beer. Or take it up with Chris White. Peace out.
Let me try to make this simple for you. If you and ten of you closest friends are locked in a room with 100 big macs. For the first few days there will be a feeding frenzy, then the food will run out, then some of you will die of starvation. Some will live longer then others and then you will be chilled and fall to the bottom. You will then be put into another room with 5000 big macs and the frenzy will start again. Now, if all ten of your friends lived and you were all put into the room with 5000 big macs, do you think you will eat more big macs faster?
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Old 07-02-2010, 04:26 AM   #22
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Now that I can relate to. Thanks for the tip!

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Old 07-02-2010, 04:33 AM   #23
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Now that I can relate to. Thanks for the tip!
Don’t know why I used the big mac analogy…im a vegetarian. I guess I thought it would be more convincing then the tofu angle.
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Old 07-02-2010, 04:37 AM   #24
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Let me try to make this simple for you. If you and ten of you closest friends are locked in a room with 100 big macs. For the first few days there will be a feeding frenzy, then the food will run out, then some of you will die of starvation. Some will live longer then others and then you will be chilled and fall to the bottom. You will then be put into another room with 5000 big macs and the frenzy will start again. Now, if all ten of your friends lived and you were all put into the room with 5000 big macs, do you think you will eat more big macs faster?
Roughly what percentage die in the couple of days after the starter fermentation is finished, and it has been stored at fridge temps?

(I'm wondering about yeast, not mike's big-mac-eating friends).
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Old 07-02-2010, 04:52 AM   #25
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Roughly what percentage die in the couple of days after the starter fermentation is finished, and it has been stored at fridge temps?

(I'm wondering about yeast, not mike's big-mac-eating friends).
First of all, the yeast die as the food is running out or has run out. After that a lot of variable come in to play but about half for the average homebrewer. The other advantages to pitching the entire starter is the activity of the yeast. If you have a continuous growth rate then pitch you have better attenuation.
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Old 07-02-2010, 04:21 PM   #26
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First of all, the yeast die as the food is running out or has run out. After that a lot of variable come in to play but about half for the average homebrewer.
What's the source for that? I've never seen anyone cite anything close to a 50% die-off after a few days of cold storage.
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Old 07-02-2010, 05:02 PM   #27
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What's the source for that? I've never seen anyone cite anything close to a 50% die-off after a few days of cold storage.
From a BA article a while back, I will try to dig it up and post it. Also the majority of the yeast don’t die from cold conditioning (see big mac analogy) it dies when the food runs out.
Anyways just a different way to go about making good beer, If you like your way better then use it. Just thought I would share some new ideas.
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Old 07-02-2010, 05:24 PM   #28
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First of all, the yeast die as the food is running out or has run out. After that a lot of variable come in to play but about half for the average homebrewer. The other advantages to pitching the entire starter is the activity of the yeast. If you have a continuous growth rate then pitch you have better attenuation.
You're acting like you know WAY more about yeast than you really do.

50% die through cold crashing?

You're advocating pitching a bunch of oxidized beer into a batch of fresh wort?

So , when you make a Dopplebock you just pitch the whole 2 gallon or so starter into your nice fresh wort................ that must taste............good
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Old 07-02-2010, 05:27 PM   #29
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From a BA article a while back, I will try to dig it up and post it. Also the majority of the yeast don’t die from cold conditioning (see big mac analogy) it dies when the food runs out.
Anyways just a different way to go about making good beer, If you like your way better then use it. Just thought I would share some new ideas.
So chilling and decanting aren't causing any die-off of yeast. That's good.

And you remember reading that about 50% of the yeast die in 2 days after fermentation is finiished? I would like to see that article. I'm really interested. That is something I certainly haven't seen before.
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Old 07-02-2010, 05:40 PM   #30
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You're acting like you know WAY more about yeast than you really do.

50% die through cold crashing?

You're advocating pitching a bunch of oxidized beer into a batch of fresh wort?

So , when you make a Dopplebock you just pitch the whole 2 gallon or so starter into your nice fresh wort................ that must taste............good
50% die through cold crashing

Not sure if I didn't state this clear or if you're having trouble understanding it but this is what I said
Also the majority of the yeast don’t die from cold conditioning (see big mac analogy) it dies when the food runs out.

The starter will not oxidize your beer if the yeast is in the aerobic state...you know because its absorbing oxygen.

Agree, big lagers are harder but I usually make a 2000 ml starter then pitch it into 2.5 gallons of beer then make 2.5 gallons more the next day. Sure that is a lot of work but the results are worth it.
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