Get your HBT Growlers, Shirts and Membership before the Rush!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Brew Science > Advanced Texts
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 06-04-2013, 05:48 PM   #11
Soviet
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 175
Liked 22 Times on 17 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Thanks for some great ideas, guys. I added a nice list to my evernote including the following:


Brewing Michael Lewis and Tom Young, 2nd Edition
Introduction to Food Engineering, 4th Edition, Singh and Heldmann
Technology Brewing and Malting 4th Edition Wolfgang Kunze
Brewing Science and Technology Series II & III vol 1-4 Institute of Brewing & Distilling, "Blue Books"
Standards of Brewing, Charles Bamforth
Brewing: Science & Practice Briggs, Boulton
Craft Brewers Lab Methods
Handbook of Brewing, W. Hardwick, Diekke
Essays in Brewing Science, Michael Lewis & Charles Bamforth
A Textbook of Brewing By Jean De Clerck

As for Designing Great Beers—I've got the book and I've read it. There's some great recipe design ideas, but I'm also interested in the "metagame" of why certain recipe decisions were/are made.

Questions like: if you want more body in a session beer, do you use flaked oats, flaked barley, carapils, use crystal malts or just mash higher? What happens when you combine those methods? What are the flavor contributions/distinctions of using any one of those methods? Are some going to give you more residual sweetness, mouthfeel, both? Commercial breweries have learned this stuff backwards and forwards long ago, but it doesn't seem like there's a lot of literature out there on the subject.

Keep the recommendations coming, I'm hearing some good things.

__________________
Soviet is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-04-2013, 06:49 PM   #12
Soviet
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 175
Liked 22 Times on 17 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Also, does anyone know anywhere one can read recently published brewing papers?

__________________
Soviet is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-04-2013, 08:54 PM   #13
suregork
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Helsinki, Finland
Posts: 29
Liked 11 Times on 5 Posts

Default

You can read the Journal of the Institute of Brewing for free:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journ...N%292050-0416/

__________________
suregork is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-05-2013, 01:34 PM   #14
ArcLight
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Millburn, NJ
Posts: 951
Liked 44 Times on 38 Posts
Likes Given: 48

Default

>.Questions like: if you want more body in a session beer, do you use flaked oats, flaked barley, carapils, use crystal malts or just mash higher? What happens when you combine those methods? What are the flavor contributions/distinctions of using any one of those methods? Are some going to give you more residual sweetness, mouthfeel, both? Commercial breweries have learned this stuff backwards and forwards long ago, but it doesn't seem like there's a lot of literature out there on the subject.

These are great questions that I'd like to know.
The easy answer is either you conduct the experiments yourself, which is time consuming.
Or maybe you can get some club members, fellow brewers interested.

Use the same recipe, except vary one thing, such as add Carapils, or add flaked oats. Then compare these variations. Even that may be dependent on the recipe, and is subjective, with just a small sample of brewers.

I would be up for participating in an experiment like this, I like in northern NJ and work in NYC.

__________________
ArcLight is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-15-2013, 02:08 PM   #15
Phil_Ozzy_Fer
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Montreal
Posts: 34
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts

Default

I'm posting this because I haven't seen anyone bring this up yet, but If you're looking for published academic research you'll have a hard time getting your hands on it. The companies that publish academic works restrict access, and unless they get paid big money, do not generally make content available to the public. It doesn't mean that it isn't available, rather, you're going to have a hard time finding it. My experience is with the Humanities, and it may be different for science-related material, but I doubt.

__________________
Phil_Ozzy_Fer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-15-2013, 02:27 PM   #16
ajdelange
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: McLean/Ogden, Virginia/Quebec
Posts: 6,372
Liked 662 Times on 549 Posts
Likes Given: 19

Default

It's no different in the sciences. The information is typically published by a non profit such as the American Society of Brewing Chemists which must, as it has no source of funds other than membership dues and fees charged for services and access to its publications, hit up the public for those services and that access. Keep in mind that not that many people join the MBAA relative to the number that, for example, join the AHA. If you speak at an AHA conference your admission is free. If you speak at an MBAA conference you get 50% off the registration.

The information is available through university libraries for example. This is great if you live in Davis but not much help if you live in the woods of Main. From time to time these oganizations open up their archives to everyone. I believe the IBS did that.

__________________
ajdelange is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-16-2013, 04:25 PM   #17
ArcLight
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Millburn, NJ
Posts: 951
Liked 44 Times on 38 Posts
Likes Given: 48

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by suregork View Post
You can read the Journal of the Institute of Brewing for free:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journ...N%292050-0416/
Thank you for the link!
I took a look at it but it's not technical enough for me, too easy and light weight.

Like article this for example -
Breeding of a high tyrosol-producing sake yeast by isolation of an ethanol-resistant mutant from a trp3 mutant (pages 264–268)




Some of them I can actually understand the title, and even some of the article:

Assessment of changes in hop resins and polyphenols during long-term storage (pages 269–279)
__________________
ArcLight is offline
Cyclman Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
For Sale - Advanced Set Up PirateBrewer For Sale 3 12-31-2010 07:10 PM
Siebel / UC Davis / Other brew school texts JonK331 General Beer Discussion 3 01-03-2010 02:16 PM
Recommendations for DIY electric texts SenorWanderer Brew Stands 4 11-05-2008 06:12 PM



Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS