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Old 05-16-2013, 04:30 PM   #1
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Default Advanced Texts

I'm into my 4th year of all grain brewing, and I'm constantly thirsting for more advanced homebrewing knowledge. Even now that I'm brewing 10 gallon batches and splitting them, I get frustrated because it still takes so much time to compare the finished products.

I want to understand for instance, the flavors of hops in isolation, or what hops taste like in different timing additions. Obviously this would take me a gajillion years to brew enough examples. Same thing with malt and specialty grains. The conventional homebrewing texts say, "Brew some SMASH beers!" While there's a ton of value in that, how long would it take me to get through only a few examples when I brew biweekly? There's got to be some distilled advanced knowledge out there that states things like, "At our brewery, we found that flaked barley worked better than carapils as a body/mouthfeel builder because it has x flavor contribution in side by side results..." or, "We've found that simcoe has x flavor contribution in the 30 minute addition vs. y flavor contribution in the dry hop." Can you guys recommend anything?

What about advanced brewing texts? I'm sure there's cutting edge research papers being published all the time on hops, yeast, etc. Where can I read that stuff!!?!?!?? Grrrrr.

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Old 05-16-2013, 06:07 PM   #2
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I don't have any recommendations for you regarding published literature (maybe check ASBC) but I have similar questions. Before I brew 5gal of my own recipe I'd like to make sure the ingredients will work out. Brewing is not like cooking where you get instant results and you'll lose a lot of time and money on a bad batch. My thoughts on this are simple: Brewing smaller batches! I am considering brewing maybe 1gal batches of a potential recipe and see how it turns out. Problem is though that my equipment is not suited for such small volumes and I'd have to improvise, thus introducing more variables.... It's not easy unfortunately!

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Old 05-21-2013, 02:18 PM   #3
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Nobody has any suggestions? Where are the Ubernerds out here?

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Old 05-25-2013, 02:34 AM   #4
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You're looking for a book to tell you what ingredients taste like?

I think this is probably what you should start with:
http://www.amazon.com/Designing-Great-Beers-Ultimate-Brewing/dp/0937381500

There are also numerous books dedicated to the brewing of specific styles. For example Brew Like a Monk, Brewing with Wheat, Farmhouse Ales, the series of Classic Styles books. Guess what For the Love of Hops is dedicated to.

There are many others as well, just look at the catalog by Brewer's Publications.

Advanced textbooks are focused more on the science of brewing (chemistry and biology). Brewing is both a science and an art, and I think you're confusing the two. There are plenty of books on the art of brewing that will give you plenty of ideas, but ultimately you're going to have to experiment and craft some beers yourself.

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Old 05-25-2013, 02:49 AM   #5
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I second the designing great beers book. Loads of info broken down for each style. Also includes tables of yeasts and hops.

Charlie Bamforth just published a paper about the microbiology of brewing (linked on here earlier this week). Not the hop/grain info but great stuff about yeast metabolism.

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Old 05-29-2013, 04:50 PM   #6
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Advanced brewing techniques by George & Laura Fixx

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Old 05-29-2013, 07:15 PM   #7
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I second designing great beers by Daniels.

Also, go to your local university and type in brewing in the search catalog. Things come up for brewing text books. A lot of them are biochemical/food science based.

Also, I've read the brewing chemistry by Fix and Fix. OK, but not terribly helpful for homebrewers general use (and I used to be an organic chemist).

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Old 05-29-2013, 07:40 PM   #8
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While this is directed at commercial brewers, A Textbook of Brewing by Jean De Clerck is a great book (heheh BOOKS). It is decades old and still a must have/go to for tons of brewing info.

http://www.siebelinstitute.com/products-a-books/brewing-textbooks?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypag e.tpl&product_id=21&category_id=9

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Old 05-29-2013, 10:18 PM   #9
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I was always frustrated with the hop descriptions that we have available to us. Pungent aroma? Floral and citrus? Great... you just explained 95% of American hops... I do have to say that is getting a lot better though. Try the Bud Light hop experiment with a bunch of different hops. I did it with a group of friends and it was both fun and educational.

http://www.bertusbrewery.com/2013/03/dry-hopped-bud-light.html

Another thing you can do is sit down with some of the commercial beers cloned from the "Can You Brew It" episodes on Brewing Network and evaluate and make notes on the beers as you evaluate the recipes and see what you pick up. You can evaluate a ton of different ingredient combinations without brewing a single beer.

Every time I have a new beer I find particularly enjoyable, I will visit the brewers website to see what I can learn about it. Sometimes they are surprisingly descriptive about their ingredients and or process.

Just a few ideas.

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Old 05-31-2013, 08:48 PM   #10
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http://extension.ucdavis.edu/unit/brewing/pdf/111_163_Brewing_Info.pdf

page 13.
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