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Old 09-17-2011, 04:41 PM   #11
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It is mostly monobasic sodium phosphate with a few percent dibasic sodium phosphate. It's pretty simple to calculate the sodium addition for a given weight of it knowing that. It is not very acidic so if your water is alkaline it will take quite a bit of it to pull the pH down to 5.7 (which is where it buffers in water). Far better to use phosphoric acid if you want to control sparge pH with phosphate. No sodium.



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Old 09-17-2011, 05:17 PM   #12
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Well I bought some and used it last time I brewed. I know NOTHING about water..or my water..or the bottled water I use for brewing..so I figured it would atleast be a good way to get the ph right without knowing much about my water. My efficiency was WAY better than the batch I brewed without it. It works for me..



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Old 09-17-2011, 05:27 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajdelange View Post
It is mostly monobasic sodium phosphate with a few percent dibasic sodium phosphate. It's pretty simple to calculate the sodium addition for a given weight of it knowing that. It is not very acidic so if your water is alkaline it will take quite a bit of it to pull the pH down to 5.7 (which is where it buffers in water). Far better to use phosphoric acid if you want to control sparge pH with phosphate. No sodium.
That makes sense- and I definitely don't need sodium in my beer!
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Old 09-17-2011, 05:30 PM   #14
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Well I bought some and used it last time I brewed. I know NOTHING about water..or my water..or the bottled water I use for brewing..so I figured it would atleast be a good way to get the ph right without knowing much about my water. My efficiency was WAY better than the batch I brewed without it. It works for me..
If the beer tastes great, then it worked for you. That's good! My results were NOT good, although my efficiency has been fine. The beer didn't taste any better, the pH didn't drop enough, lighter colored beers didn't taste good, etc.

I have about 3/4 of an old tub hanging around, and was just thinking what do do with it.
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Old 09-17-2011, 05:51 PM   #15
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The interesting thing about the stuff is that it "works great" for people who don't own or use a pH meter but that it doesn't work at all for people who do. ???

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Old 09-17-2011, 06:42 PM   #16
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The interesting thing about the stuff is that it "works great" for people who don't own or use a pH meter but that it doesn't work at all for people who do. ???
That, right there, is why I love AJ. There are a lot of subjective parameters when it comes to brewing, but there is a lot of hard science too. A mash pH buffer definitely falls into the latter category. It can be measured objectively. It either buffers to the desired pH, or it doesn't.
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Old 09-17-2011, 11:36 PM   #17
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I recently learned that a professional brewery here in Indiana uses 5.2 in their beers. Their dark beers are quite good. Their lighter beers suck, frankly.

This performance is in line with the findings that AJ and Kai have posted previously. 5.2 Stabilizer tends to move the mash pH UPWARD to around 5.7. For an acidic dark grist, that performance can be an asset. For a light colored grist with less acid, it is a serious detriment.

If you brew with distilled or RO water, 5.2 Stabilizer COULD be helpful if you're brewing a dark and acidic beer. Given that, a little knowledge of brewing water chemistry will help any brewer do a good job without 5.2 Stabilizer. Stay away.

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Old 09-18-2011, 12:02 PM   #18
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Some guys on this board know a hell of a lot more about brewing water than some professional brewers I've met. I was once chatting with three head brewers from three different Gordon Bierschs and offered the opinion that home brewers take water a lot more seriously than pros do. They all laughed and heartily agreed.

FWIW two were local (DC metro area). They both use sauermalz and check pH - occasionally. The other guy was from the midwest somewhere (don't remember where). His mains water is so bad he has brewing water trucked in.



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