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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Lambic & Wild Brewing > Yet another bottling question.
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Old 07-12-2012, 10:59 AM   #1
BryanThompson
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Default Yet another bottling question.

I did a search on this but couldn't find anything but, I bottled my first lambic two nights ago and in order to be able to enter it into the Kentucky State Fair I had to put some into long necks. Each bottle was primed to give 4.5 volumes of CO2. If I used good bottles without imperfections like bubbles and whatnot, will I run the risk of bottle bombs? I went ahead and placed the bottles into a box and put the box into a thick garbage bag just in case, I just wanted to see if you all thought it would be fine.

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Old 07-12-2012, 01:07 PM   #2
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It's probably good that you took the precautions you did, as I've heard from numerous sources that standard brown beer bottles without imperfections can withstand no more than 2.8, maybe 3, volumes of CO2. Let us know how it turns out!

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Old 07-12-2012, 02:11 PM   #3
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Yeah those bottles are definitely not designed to handle that much pressure.

The saving grace for you is if that beer sat for a year or so there's a lot less CO2 in suspension so you probably won't have 4.5 volumes. You might be lucky to get to 2.5 volumes. However, if you didn't let that beer age very long you might end up with a lot of extra fermentation in those bottles.

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Old 07-12-2012, 02:32 PM   #4
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The carbonation should be fairly low. It is only seven months old, but I moved the fermentor about two miles to my new house so that should have brought a lot of the CO2 out of solution. When I figured how much priming sugar to use I put the temperature that the fermenter was sitting at as 80 degrees instead of figuring from zero.

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Old 07-12-2012, 03:10 PM   #5
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i accidently used double priming sugar for a batch (used 5 gallons worth of sucrose for a 2.5 gallon batch). i used 4 ounces in 2.5 gallons which works out to just over 4.0 volumes co2. the beer came out extremely fizzy but i didn't have even one bottle break.

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Old 07-12-2012, 05:46 PM   #6
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I recently had a bit of a screw up where I added three times too much priming sugar. It was bottled in standard 12oz longnecks. None broke but it was undrinkable because when you opened it the beer shot out like a huge fountain. There's no way to get the beer in the glass before it poured out all over the counter, walls and ceiling. Fortunately it didn't taste very good so I didn't lose anything of value, just some time cleaning. However, those bottles sat at room temperature for a couple weeks then spent a few days in the fridge.

I'd be most concerned about how those bottles do sitting in postal warehouses and trucks when it's 100+ out. You'll have to keep us updated on whether comments come back that the bottles were busted upon arrival.

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Old 07-12-2012, 07:57 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BryanThompson View Post
Each bottle was primed to give 4.5 volumes of CO2.
1) Your bottles probably won't explode. If they do, it will probably be on the judges. Gusher, anyone? (I nearly drowned my phone with one gusher!)

2) It's the BJCP judge in me coming out, but if you entered it as a lambic (and it carbonates well), you will get dinged for it not being carbonated to style. Lambics are nearly uncarbonated. Gueuze is highly carbonated. Just FYI.
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Old 07-13-2012, 10:23 AM   #8
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The lambic has apricot puree. Fruit lambics are supposed to be highly carbonated right?

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Old 07-14-2012, 03:02 AM   #9
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You should be fine, most bottles can withstand way more than that. I wouldn't recommend making it a habit as some bottles are weaker than others and you are just gambling, waiting for a bottle to eventually explode.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brulosopher View Post
It's probably good that you took the precautions you did, as I've heard from numerous sources that standard brown beer bottles without imperfections can withstand no more than 2.8, maybe 3, volumes of CO2. Let us know how it turns out!
Precautions are always good.

I regularly bottle to 3 volumes in standard bottles and not had a bottle explode (single exception noted below).

I recently had a bottle of stout explode on me. It was a stout, bottled to about 2.5 volumes. I checked the gravity of the beer from another bottle and found it had dropped about .006 since bottling; that's about 6 additional volumes. I did drink the rest of the bottles quickly, many were gushers, but only 1 bottle broke after carbonating to about 8 volumes.
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Old 07-17-2012, 04:13 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ReverseApacheMaster View Post
I'd be most concerned about how those bottles do sitting in postal warehouses and trucks when it's 100+ out. You'll have to keep us updated on whether comments come back that the bottles were busted upon arrival.
Luckily that won't be an issue. I will be driving them to the state fair still in the trash bag and with the AC on. Once they arrive they will be sitting in the AC waiting for judging.

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Originally Posted by Calder View Post
You should be fine, most bottles can withstand way more than that. I wouldn't recommend making it a habit as some bottles are weaker than others and you are just gambling, waiting for a bottle to eventually explode.
There needs to be a way to enter lambics in champagne/belgian bottles. Everything must be in a 12 ounce longneck or it faces disqualification.
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Primary: Epic Flemish Brown(15g) waiting to go into a bourbon barrel, Brett C. Blackberry Berliner, lambic waiting for fruit
Secondary: Sour Brown Ale from Black IPA second runnings sitting on 2.5lbs. blackberries and 2.5lbs mulberries
Bottled: Traditional Mead aged on Maker's 46 soaked oak, Brett Maibock

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