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Old 10-10-2011, 01:55 PM   #1
jamest22
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Default Wyeast Roselare - Aerate Wort Before Pitching?

I'm going to be using Wyeast's Roselare blend for brewing a flanders red this weekend. Should I aerate the wort just as I would any other ale before pitching the blend?

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Old 10-10-2011, 02:13 PM   #2
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Wow, Just read the description on Wyeast's site. Up to 18 months aging to properly finish!!!! And it says not to propogate the culture.

It says nothing about aeration but I would expect the yeast would need oxygen. I don't know though, maybe a call to Wyeast would be the best route.

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Old 10-10-2011, 02:15 PM   #3
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I used that yeast on a sour brown a few weeks ago and aerated as normal. As long as you are pitching Roselare as your primary, aerate it.

Have you thought about whether or not you are making a starter? The general consensus seems to be that for blends of yeasts (such as Roselare), a starter should not be made. Just additional food for thought.

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Old 10-10-2011, 02:19 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dabblenben View Post
I used that yeast on a sour brown a few weeks ago and aerated as normal. As long as you are pitching Roselare as your primary, aerate it.

Have you thought about whether or not you are making a starter? The general consensus seems to be that for blends of yeasts (such as Roselare), a starter should not be made. Just additional food for thought.
Thanks. No, I do not plan on making a starter, as I have read that it would lead to an unpredictable ratio of the yeast/bacteria to be pitched. The plan is to pitch 1 smack pack into 5 gallons of 1.051 wort.
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Old 10-10-2011, 06:47 PM   #5
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Yes aerate like normal. The Saccharomyces can use it. No starter needed for 1.051 wort.

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Old 10-10-2011, 07:03 PM   #6
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Thanks. I can't wait to brew this one this weekend. I'm following the Flanders Red recipe in the book Wild Brews.

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Old 10-10-2011, 08:04 PM   #7
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I also plan to use this strain soon on an oud bruin, and have read about the long aging required. Will you transfer to a secondary vessel, after primary fermentation is done, e.g. after a month or two, for aging? Or will you age in the same primary?

I don't secondary any more for my "normal" ales, but a year plus of aging would seem to warrant, so as to get it off of the main yeast cake.

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Old 10-10-2011, 08:12 PM   #8
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I plan to rack the beer to a secondary fermenter once primary fermentation is completed. I am guessing this will be in the three to four week time-frame.

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Old 10-10-2011, 11:53 PM   #9
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You might want to read up on secondary for this beer. The bacteria and brettanomyces yeast are supposed to be nourished by the yeast cake. If you primary in a bucket, by all means rack and try to leave a small head space so there is less exposure to oxygen. Acetobacter may give off too much acetic acid (vinegar) if there is high exposure to oxygen. If you need to rack, you may wish to add some of the trub from the primary to feed the Brett and bacteria.

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Old 10-11-2011, 12:28 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cervezarara View Post
You might want to read up on secondary for this beer. The bacteria and brettanomyces yeast are supposed to be nourished by the yeast cake. If you primary in a bucket, by all means rack and try to leave a small head space so there is less exposure to oxygen. Acetobacter may give off too much acetic acid (vinegar) if there is high exposure to oxygen. If you need to rack, you may wish to add some of the trub from the primary to feed the Brett and bacteria.
Thanks. I have read that the yeast cake can provide nutrients for the bacteria & brett. I also read this article http://www.themadfermentationist.com...r-at-home.html written by a guy who says he typically racks after primary is complete.

I think I may aim for a comprimise and secondary, but rack over some of the yeast cake as you suggest. I plan to primary in a 6 gallon better bottle and secondary in a 5 gallon glass carboy. The 5 gallon glass carboy will be ideal in volume and composition for minimizing oxidation in secondary.

Also, I looked at your pictures of Cantillon brewery. My wife and I were just there last month for the first time. An amazing place isn't it? I couldn't beleive it when Jean Van Roy poured our tasting at the end of the self guided tour.
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