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Old 09-23-2012, 05:50 PM   #191
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My data to complete the table:

Brewer: diegobonatto
Beer style: Belgian Tripel
Yeast: WLP644
Starter: two steps, 2 Liters
Details: incubator (shaker) - culture growth @ 28 °C for 6 days (3 days for each step).
OG: 1.080
FG: 1.007

Two weeks in primary, starting @ 18 °C until beginning of fermentation; then the temperature was slowly raised to 21-23° C. After two weeks, temperature was reduced to 1-3 °C and the beer was kept for more two weeks at these temperatures until bottling.

Very interesting results - strong alcohol taste/aroma that is beginning to fade now. Big fruity aromas (banana specially), with a nice malt aftertaste from Pilsen malt.



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Old 09-23-2012, 06:42 PM   #192
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I'll add my 2 to the list
#1: blond, 2L starter no stirplate, 1.063 to 1.009, started around 64F let get into the 70s for 4 weeks, pretty fruity & banana. accidentally left the lid loose for over a week so it got plenty of oxygen, zero funk or sour

#2: american saison, re-used some of the yeast cake from blond, 1.052 to 1.006, 70-78F for 4 weeks, fruity again but less banana thankfully

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Originally Posted by JLem View Post
Something I wonder about this particular strain is whether it will continue to work on the longer chain dextrines slowly over time. .
I can't say for this strain cuz I haven't had it long enuf, but my other 100% brett beers never continued to work. got a few diff ones over a year old & no gushers


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Old 09-24-2012, 01:50 AM   #193
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Quote:
Originally Posted by diegobonatto View Post
My data to complete the table:

Brewer: diegobonatto
Beer style: Belgian Tripel
Yeast: WLP644
Starter: two steps, 2 Liters
Details: incubator (shaker) - culture growth @ 28 °C for 6 days (3 days for each step).
OG: 1.080
FG: 1.007

Two weeks in primary, starting @ 18 °C until beginning of fermentation; then the temperature was slowly raised to 21-23° C. After two weeks, temperature was reduced to 1-3 °C and the beer was kept for more two weeks at these temperatures until bottling.

Very interesting results - strong alcohol taste/aroma that is beginning to fade now. Big fruity aromas (banana specially), with a nice malt aftertaste from Pilsen malt.
Any data on mash temps? I am wondering if mash temps should be raised to get a less dry beer as compared to using sacc yeast?

Also anyone using acidulated malt? If so at what percentage and are you adding to regular mash or doing a mini mash?
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Old 09-24-2012, 01:57 AM   #194
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Also what about Krausen characteristics? One of the brewers that was reporting no signs of fermentation as far as a krausen and bubbles out of his airlock did a gravity check and it appears to be fermenting fine.

Quote:
I haven't checked the gravity yet, because I've really seen no activity and didn't want to expose the wort for nothing. But I'll check it in the morning. I'm using a glass carboy, in a fermentation chamber with a blow off tube.

As for my starter, I went for 10 days with the following step routine:

Day 1: pitched 1/2 vial and 1/2 liter wort with yeast nutrient
Started in 2000mL erlenmeyer flask on stir plate
Day 4: added 1/2 liter wort with yeast nutrient to starter
Day 8: added 1 liter wort with yeast nutrient to starter
Day 10: pitched yeast into wort.

I'll be in touch tomorrow.
When he checked his gravity here is what he said:


Quote:
Well, this is really interesting. I checked the gravity and its down to 1.025 (from 1.072), so it's been at work. Maybe it's jus the characteristic of the yeast but there was almost no krausen and no visible bubbling in the blowoff.
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Old 09-24-2012, 02:05 AM   #195
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BigLJD had this to say about his version which also seems to have picked back up again.

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I stirred mine a little bit again earlier tonight with my wine thief and activity is definitely picking back up on mine. I just checked the airlock and it's continuously bubbling now. Hopefully it'll stay that way for a few days and get me a drinkable beer. I'm going to leave it be now until airlock activity stops again and then I'll re-check the gravity.
Learning new yeasts is always fun, especially something like a brett yeast that seems to have a mind and a plan of it's own

Quote:
Most of my initial fermentation occurred in the first 20 hours, and I didn't have much krausen either, so it probably fermented down without you even noticing.
Try to keep it around 80 and be patient and it should pick back up again. Swirling it a little bit to keep the yeast roused won't hurt either. My airlock has been consistently bubbling every 3-5 seconds for the last 36 hours, and my gravity has dropped 4 more points, so I'm back in business again. It would seem our batch of yeast likes to ferment like a bat out of hell for 24 hours and then take a nap for a week before waking back up again to finish the job (I hope it finishes anyways).
So it seems that this yeast can sometimes not really show any traditional fermentation patterns. It seems to sometimes not really krausen and also seems to "take a break" in the middle of fermentation.

It appears as though my Rye 2XIPA is also doing the same thing as BigLJD's right now it does not seem to be fermenting very much any more. Be interesting to see if it follows the same pattern as BigLJD's beer does. The spacing between our brewing time is about the time it took him to see lag. I brewed a good 3-5 days after he did and now my beer seems to be seeing a lull in fermentation activity. Wonder if it will pick back up like his?
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Old 09-24-2012, 12:19 PM   #196
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NcBrewer35 View Post
Any data on mash temps? I am wondering if mash temps should be raised to get a less dry beer as compared to using sacc yeast?

Also anyone using acidulated malt? If so at what percentage and are you adding to regular mash or doing a mini mash?
My mash profile:

Acid rest 38,0 C 40 min
Protein rest 52,0 C 20 min
Maltose 1 63,0 C 30 min
Maltose 2 68,0 C 40 min
Saccharification 1 73,0 C 60 min
Saccharification 2 78,0 C 15 min

Being a Tripel, sugar was added to compose 20% of grist weight, which explain the low FG obtained. Moreover, the beer is not watery or thin, but have a nice medium body, as expected for a Tripel.

No acidulated malt here.
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Old 09-24-2012, 02:07 PM   #197
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As NCBrewer noted, my fermentation had re-started a couple days after warming the beer up to around 80 and gently stirring it to rouse the yeast. The gravity dropped 5 or 6 points and it was on it's way to finishing. Well, my kid left the window open in the room it was in last night and temps outside were in the upper 40's last night so even with the seedling heat mat under the bucket the temp dropped to 76 and airlock activity had mostly stalled. I closed the window this morning and threw a thick bath towel over the bucket and the heating pad to insulate it a bit and try to warm it back up again. If I can squeeze another 5-6 points out of this fermentation I'll be right where I want to be.
This is purely speculative, but in my case this yeast seems to be really sensitive to temperature variations, especially later in fermentation. Initially it fermented vigorously but for me to get it finish I seem to have to hold it around 80 with no temp variations or activity quickly drops.
I'm curious too, about how many others are using acid malt in their grain bill with this yeast? Chad's research seems to show an improvement in attenuation with a lower ph beer, but if nobody else is using it and getting 80% attenuation then I won't be adding it again. I used 12oz acid malt in this beer.

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Old 09-25-2012, 04:07 AM   #198
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I haven't seen real attenuation differences with acid malt. Have used the strain for 3 IPAs, the first went from 1.056 to 1.007 w/o acid malt (also no starter but 2 vials), the second was re-pitch 1.059 to 1.004, and third pitch was 1.053 to 1.008 (only 2 week ferment). The last 2 had almost 10% acid malt addition. What I did see is that the acid malt beers had a better fruitiness from the yeast. Not really scientific because of the no starter for the first, and the fact that the first was a black IPA, the second was a standard IPA, and the third was a white IPA. Those variables could have accounted for the changes in flavor but who knows. All were mashed at 148 to 150. However, this has become my go to IPA strain and will become a 4th batch this weekend.

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Old 09-25-2012, 04:43 PM   #199
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Well, I'm currently fermenting my third all-Brett Trois beer. So far I have made a pale ale and fermented at 70 F (taste test tonight). Next, I made an IPA that fermented at 65 F.

Now, I have a wheat that will serve as the base beer for a sour. The wheat was brewed a few days ago and put in the fermentation chamber at 60 F, which is where I normally ferment with US-05. Twenty four hours after pitching and it is clearly fermenting. Interesting to see that temperature (at least between 60 ad 70) is not really slowing down the Trois.

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Old 09-25-2012, 05:43 PM   #200
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Quote:
Originally Posted by berebrando
Well, I'm currently fermenting my third all-Brett Trois beer. So far I have made a pale ale and fermented at 70 F (taste test tonight). Next, I made an IPA that fermented at 65 F.

Now, I have a wheat that will serve as the base beer for a sour. The wheat was brewed a few days ago and put in the fermentation chamber at 60 F, which is where I normally ferment with US-05. Twenty four hours after pitching and it is clearly fermenting. Interesting to see that temperature (at least between 60 ad 70) is not really slowing down the Trois.
Glad to hear this. I'm probably going to brew a batch tomorrow and was thinking of fermenting it down in the low 60s. I was wondering if this would work ok. The last one I made was fermented in the 70s. This time I'm going for a brown ale base that I'm going to add cranberries to. A beer for Thanksgiving. I'm thinking that the fruitiness from the yeast, the tartness of the cranberries, and the the sweetness from the malt will meld really nicely.


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