Ss Brewing Technologies Giveaway!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Lambic & Wild Brewing > WLP644 -Brett B Trois
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 09-22-2012, 12:18 AM   #181
berebrando
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Orange, CA
Posts: 199
Liked 19 Times on 19 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

In the first email, I would say the mash temperature negatively impacted the fermentation. Also, while the suggested temperature range for this yeast is pretty high, I think that applies to secondary aging rather than a primary ferment. Maybe hit the brew with some amylase enzyme to increase fermentables? (I've never done this before, but it's all I can think of to save this brew)

It is very weird that the second brewer had issues with fermentation during the starter stage. I had a big Sacc-like krausen in my starter. I think something went wrong with the starter prep, as s/he suggests, but I'm just speculating based on the description.

__________________
berebrando is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-22-2012, 01:28 AM   #182
NcBrewer35
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Charlotte, North Carolina
Posts: 65
Liked 13 Times on 10 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

Actually let me correct what I said earlier. We all did + or - 2000ml starters not 1000ml.

__________________
NcBrewer35 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-22-2012, 01:24 PM   #183
bigljd
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 471
Liked 22 Times on 18 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by NcBrewer35 View Post
OK, I may have a problem unless this brett ferments in cycles. It's been 1 week since I brewed, so I checked the gravity so we have some data on how the brett functions, and my gravity was exactly the same as it was after 45 hours. Its stuck at 1.027. It's very sweet still (cloyingly sweet) since it's only fermented 45% of the sugars. I did mash a bit warmer (156-157) since I expected the brett to rip through everything, but there's no way it should finish this high.

I had been fermenting in mid-70's (room temp at our house right now), which is on the low end of the yeast's range, so I put my seedling heating mat under the fermenting bucket tonight. I also gently stirred with a SS spoon to try to rouse the yeast. I should be able to get it into the 80's I think, so hopefully the warmer temps will invigorate the yeasties to start up again. If not I'll need a plan B.

If anyone has any suggestions (other than the warmer temps) I'm open to them. I suppose it could just need more time, but there is no signs of fermentation (it's starting to clear) and no gravity drop in 5 days. If this were my personal brew I'd consider hitting with some of my Wyeast Brett Lambicus that I have after another week or two of inactivity. Adding another brett should knock down the gravity like adding brett in secondary, but that would completely screw up the dynamics of our experiment (plus it may not be ready in time).

I'll keep an eye on it, maybe it will wake up after i warm it a bit.

I had great fermentation 12 hours from pitching - the yeast ripped thru the first 55% of the sugars, then just stopped. Not sure why. The heating mat has it up to 79 today - there's very little airlock activity. I'll wait and see how you guy's beers do, and give mine some more time. Mabye it's like that DuPont Saison strain that craps out for two weeks and come back to life after that to finish?
The email above is actually mine. Some more specifics about the beer is it's mostly a copy of Tasty McDole's Janet's Brown recipe, only I switched out the 1lb of wheat for a 1lb of quick oats. The SG was actually 1.061 and it's currently stuck at 1.027. Everything I've read suggested that the Brett Trois rips through everything, and most people were getting 80%+ attenuation, so to counter that I mashed a bit higher (156-157) instead of the 154 suggested in the recipe, since I was hoping for some body left in the beer. I pitched a 2 liter stir plate starter that was stepped up 3 times over a week. I didn't aerate other than splashing the crap out of it while cooling and racking to the fermenter. Initial fermentation was strong, but then it crapped out at 1.027.
The recipe does have a lot of carapils and crystal malts in it - that combined with the higher mash temp would definitely leave a normal sacc yeast finishing way too sweet, but I guess I assumed that brett trois would rip through some of those sugars. Looks like I was wrong.
Maybe I'll just rack this batch to a carboy and pitch some Wyeast Brett L and let it sit for a few months, and re-brew the same beer at a lower mash temp for our club experiment. I guess I'll wait to see how the other club beers turn out first.
bigljd is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-22-2012, 01:49 PM   #184
mhenry41h
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Harrisburg, Pennsylvania
Posts: 896
Liked 6 Times on 5 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bigljd

The email above is actually mine. Some more specifics about the beer is it's mostly a copy of Tasty McDole's Janet's Brown recipe, only I switched out the 1lb of wheat for a 1lb of quick oats. The SG was actually 1.061 and it's currently stuck at 1.027. Everything I've read suggested that the Brett Trois rips through everything, and most people were getting 80%+ attenuation, so to counter that I mashed a bit higher (156-157) instead of the 154 suggested in the recipe, since I was hoping for some body left in the beer. I pitched a 2 liter stir plate starter that was stepped up 3 times over a week. I didn't aerate other than splashing the crap out of it while cooling and racking to the fermenter. Initial fermentation was strong, but then it crapped out at 1.027.
The recipe does have a lot of carapils and crystal malts in it - that combined with the higher mash temp would definitely leave a normal sacc yeast finishing way too sweet, but I guess I assumed that brett trois would rip through some of those sugars. Looks like I was wrong.
Maybe I'll just rack this batch to a carboy and pitch some Wyeast Brett L and let it sit for a few months, and re-brew the same beer at a lower mash temp for our club experiment. I guess I'll wait to see how the other club beers turn out first.
Sounds like a good candidate for an weird Oud Bruin! Throw a pitch of Roselare in there and let that sucker sit!!!
__________________

Fermenting: Lambic and Dry Orange Blossom Mead
Conditioning: Brett Drei Golden Strong
Next: Nut Brown, Wee Heavy, & Rye IPA
Drinking: Brett - Aussie Blonde, Black IPA, Belgian Stout, Munich Helles

Follow My Brewing Excursions at:


www.draconianlibations.blogspot.com


http://www.facebook.com/pages/Draconian-Libations/258343357538490
___________________
Draconian Libations

mhenry41h is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-22-2012, 02:24 PM   #185
bigljd
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 471
Liked 22 Times on 18 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mhenry41h View Post
Sounds like a good candidate for an weird Oud Bruin! Throw a pitch of Roselare in there and let that sucker sit!!!
I thought about that too, the only problem is the recipe has 50 IBUs so I'm not sure the sour would go too well with the bitter (plus the lacto and pedio would have a tough time working at those IBUs).
I also thought about rebrewing it at very low mash temps, leaving out the carapils and cutting 1/2 the crystal. I should end up with a super dry beer I could blend back with the first batch to balance the sweetness. Then I'd have 5 gals of beer to share with the club, and 5 for me to drink.
Not sure what I'll do yet.
bigljd is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-22-2012, 02:36 PM   #186
mhenry41h
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Harrisburg, Pennsylvania
Posts: 896
Liked 6 Times on 5 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bigljd

I thought about that too, the only problem is the recipe has 50 IBUs so I'm not sure the sour would go too well with the bitter (plus the lacto and pedio would have a tough time working at those IBUs).
I also thought about rebrewing it at very low mash temps, leaving out the carapils and cutting 1/2 the crystal. I should end up with a super dry beer I could blend back with the first batch to balance the sweetness. Then I'd have 5 gals of beer to share with the club, and 5 for me to drink.
Not sure what I'll do yet.
I wasn't thinking about the IBU load...you are dead right...the bacteria won't be happy. Brewing a dry version and blending is a terrific idea.
__________________

Fermenting: Lambic and Dry Orange Blossom Mead
Conditioning: Brett Drei Golden Strong
Next: Nut Brown, Wee Heavy, & Rye IPA
Drinking: Brett - Aussie Blonde, Black IPA, Belgian Stout, Munich Helles

Follow My Brewing Excursions at:


www.draconianlibations.blogspot.com


http://www.facebook.com/pages/Draconian-Libations/258343357538490
___________________
Draconian Libations

mhenry41h is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-22-2012, 04:05 PM   #187
bogwart
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: league city, Texas
Posts: 24
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

If you can, just let it ride would be my opinion. I don't have a fancy stir plate so I propped up my starter in a growler. I started with around 1000ml of 1.030 wort for 7 days, then added an additional 1000ml 1.030 wort for another 7 days. My recipe followed Chad Yakobson's recipe in Zymurgy and I mashed at 152. I had strong, active fermentation for roughly two weeks then it tapered off to a moderate but still active fermentation for the third week. It went from a 1.054 to a 1.010. I checked it again at week 4 and it's down to a 1.008. I still have the thick krausen on top of the beer as well. From that same starter, I did pitch roughly 250ml into one gallon of a stout that stalled at 1.026 (from a 1.088). In four weeks, it's only dropped to a 1.020, but it still seems to be active. I'd try to give it some time...you might be in the lag phase and it'll kick back up again soon.

__________________
bogwart is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-22-2012, 06:06 PM   #188
JLem
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Attleboro, MA
Posts: 3,641
Liked 168 Times on 148 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bigljd View Post
The email above is actually mine. Some more specifics about the beer is it's mostly a copy of Tasty McDole's Janet's Brown recipe, only I switched out the 1lb of wheat for a 1lb of quick oats. The SG was actually 1.061 and it's currently stuck at 1.027. Everything I've read suggested that the Brett Trois rips through everything, and most people were getting 80%+ attenuation, so to counter that I mashed a bit higher (156-157) instead of the 154 suggested in the recipe, since I was hoping for some body left in the beer. I pitched a 2 liter stir plate starter that was stepped up 3 times over a week. I didn't aerate other than splashing the crap out of it while cooling and racking to the fermenter. Initial fermentation was strong, but then it crapped out at 1.027.
The recipe does have a lot of carapils and crystal malts in it - that combined with the higher mash temp would definitely leave a normal sacc yeast finishing way too sweet, but I guess I assumed that brett trois would rip through some of those sugars. Looks like I was wrong.
Maybe I'll just rack this batch to a carboy and pitch some Wyeast Brett L and let it sit for a few months, and re-brew the same beer at a lower mash temp for our club experiment. I guess I'll wait to see how the other club beers turn out first.
Something I wonder about this particular strain is whether it will continue to work on the longer chain dextrines slowly over time. I purposely under-primed my bottles because was worried that, even though my batch finished at 1.011 or so, the Brett would keep chewing away. I don't know that this will happen, but I wonder if you left your beer alone for a while you'd see the Brett continue to slowly bring it down.
__________________
My Hombrewing Blog

My Beer Cellar
JLem is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-23-2012, 01:22 AM   #189
NcBrewer35
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Charlotte, North Carolina
Posts: 65
Liked 13 Times on 10 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by berebrando View Post
I really like this little chart you have here. Any information as far as fermentation temperature? I have mine going at 74 degrees (Rye Double IPA), One of the brewers has his at 78 degrees (Old Ale) . Not sure what BigLJD was initially fermenting at I believe he said mid 70's which is similar to mine. I think I am going to bump mine up to 78 degrees to hopefully avoid the lag.

Perhaps we can flush this chart out a little more with additional data such as fermentation temperatures, and the role acidulated malt plays in the fermentation.

We are going to be doing a presentation on this yeast for our club so once it is done I would be more than happy to post the presentation for others to learn from. This chart would go great in it
__________________
NcBrewer35 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-23-2012, 05:12 PM   #190
berebrando
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Orange, CA
Posts: 199
Liked 19 Times on 19 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by NcBrewer35

I really like this little chart you have here. Any information as far as fermentation temperature? I have mine going at 74 degrees (Rye Double IPA), One of the brewers has his at 78 degrees (Old Ale) . Not sure what BigLJD was initially fermenting at I believe he said mid 70's which is similar to mine. I think I am going to bump mine up to 78 degrees to hopefully avoid the lag.

Perhaps we can flush this chart out a little more with additional data such as fermentation temperatures, and the role acidulated malt plays in the fermentation.

We are going to be doing a presentation on this yeast for our club so once it is done I would be more than happy to post the presentation for others to learn from. This chart would go great in it
I think it would be a great idea to add data points for fermentation temp. There are still a lot of holes, but it is a good start. Obviously the more people post their data points and results, the better the collective table will be. Feel free to use it.
__________________
www.thegoodbeerco.com
berebrando is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Repitching Brett from a 100% Brett fermented beer Coff Lambic & Wild Brewing 11 05-29-2014 01:40 AM
All-Brett still going Calder Lambic & Wild Brewing 6 02-02-2012 03:45 PM
Adding Brett to a Brett beer Calder Lambic & Wild Brewing 4 09-28-2011 04:39 PM
First All Brett November Lambic & Wild Brewing 12 06-25-2011 01:39 AM
Brett or something else? twohands Lambic & Wild Brewing 15 02-15-2010 12:52 AM