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Old 10-23-2011, 03:45 AM   #41
Pith
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It's been a week since it started and has bubbled vigourously since. Still smells very vegetably and savoury. Before degassing each day it smells a bit eggy, but nice after degassing. Had a slight taste and it's not at all unpleasant, but again, nothing to write home about. Tastes slightly alcoholic, so there's definitely yeast there (also remembered that there were indeed small white cultures growing on the surface of a wild starter I added, so definitely yeast in there).

Tastes as though it would be a uniquelly interesting addition to a beer; I definitely recommend using jaggery in a brew if you're feeling adventurous.

Will update again later.

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Primary:
7L of NSPA + 1kg honey + 3L white grape juice
Bulk Aging:
3787 Saaz/Styrian Porter (on palm sugar)
Autumn Wheat Beer (on "Profruit Krimsonberries")
3787 Bochet
Jack Keller's Seville Orange Wine
Bottled:
Nelson Sauvin Pale Ale
Autumn Wheat Beer
3787 Saaz/Styrian Porter
3787 Bochet
3787 Dubbel
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Wild Cyser
Future:
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Old 10-28-2011, 11:26 PM   #42
Pith
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Whelp, it's been about 12 days since pitching, and the must seems to have mostly settled down. It's still definitely doing something though; as I type this I just saw a single big (3mm?) bubble attached to a chunk of sediment rise quickly to the top, pop, and the sediment slowly glided back down. Cool.

So, just to recap, the info I can find suggests that unrefined palm sugar (jaggery) consists of about 50% sucrose (but with longer chains), 20% invert sugars (sucrose that has been inverted to glucose and fructose), water up to 20%, and the remainder consists of wood ash, proteins and bagasse fibres.

The liquid in the top half of the bottle is beginning to clear and is a deep "dirty orange" colour, and the bottom half of the liquid is slightly murkier and lighter in colour. At the bottom is the most interesting sediment. At the very bottom of the bottle is is a sediment that looks like sedimentary rock, light brown with horizontal layers of white all through it, rather like this but less precise: http://t0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:A...fN0dMHMrpIvPtA

On top of this layer is a milky/pearlescent white layer, which upon shaking does not disturb as readily as the aforementioned layer, and requires more vigourous shaking. Do you think that would be the yeast layer? On top of that is a very thin layer of light brown, followed by a very thin layer of yellowish. These top two are barely noticeable unless you're looking carefully. The top one might even just be light filtering through.

At this moment I don't have the means to photograph close up, but when I do I will.

I just tasted the top and it's not sweet; actually rather insipid, which is predictable since there's nothing in it other than water, yeast and unrefeind sugar. Not offensive, but not "pleasant" by any means. Then I shook it up and degassed, and it tastes a lot different; the sediment really gives it a kick, and it actually smelled more... alcoholic, which can't be right, since alcohol doesnt sink. It's unlike anything I've ever tasted before and probably not suitable as a "beverage", but if nothing else I imagine the sediment would probably be very interesting in a stirfry, since jaggery itself is used in ethnic cooking anyway.

The only thing I can think of to do (after a few days of further clearing) is to
1. shake, settle for a while, and rack off the lightbrown/white layered sediment
2. freeze/refridgerate the sediment for further culinary use
3. add more of the adjunct to the liquid/yeast
4. wait until clearing
5. repeat all steps.

I might use the liquid in novelty Bloody Mary when we're all too drunk to get upset about it, and use the unfermentables at the bottom in a sauce. I'll also reserve judgment until it's cleared as much as it will.

__________________
Primary:
7L of NSPA + 1kg honey + 3L white grape juice
Bulk Aging:
3787 Saaz/Styrian Porter (on palm sugar)
Autumn Wheat Beer (on "Profruit Krimsonberries")
3787 Bochet
Jack Keller's Seville Orange Wine
Bottled:
Nelson Sauvin Pale Ale
Autumn Wheat Beer
3787 Saaz/Styrian Porter
3787 Bochet
3787 Dubbel
Jack Keller's Seville Orange Wine
Wild Cyser
Future:
Stella-hopped Saison
Blackberry Wine or Bochet
Stout Bochet
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Old 10-29-2011, 01:05 AM   #43
Pith
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Actually, I think I remember the unsavoury flavour being in the starter as well, which means it's the organisms and not the adjuncts.

Dumped.

__________________
Primary:
7L of NSPA + 1kg honey + 3L white grape juice
Bulk Aging:
3787 Saaz/Styrian Porter (on palm sugar)
Autumn Wheat Beer (on "Profruit Krimsonberries")
3787 Bochet
Jack Keller's Seville Orange Wine
Bottled:
Nelson Sauvin Pale Ale
Autumn Wheat Beer
3787 Saaz/Styrian Porter
3787 Bochet
3787 Dubbel
Jack Keller's Seville Orange Wine
Wild Cyser
Future:
Stella-hopped Saison
Blackberry Wine or Bochet
Stout Bochet
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Old 10-29-2011, 08:47 AM   #44
statseeker
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That sucks. I'm sorry to hear the project hasnt come along further. Try try again?

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Old 10-30-2011, 08:54 PM   #45
Pith
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Yeah. I'm making a sourdough starter (bubbles and hooch are forming, so it's working) and I've also left a cup of sweet stuff outside (added lemon; acid discourages mould, right?) but I'm not as hopeful about the results, and can't really think of anything I'd do with it.

I'll probably wait two weeks this time like the sticky suggests so hopefully there's more saccharomyces in it than other things.

__________________
Primary:
7L of NSPA + 1kg honey + 3L white grape juice
Bulk Aging:
3787 Saaz/Styrian Porter (on palm sugar)
Autumn Wheat Beer (on "Profruit Krimsonberries")
3787 Bochet
Jack Keller's Seville Orange Wine
Bottled:
Nelson Sauvin Pale Ale
Autumn Wheat Beer
3787 Saaz/Styrian Porter
3787 Bochet
3787 Dubbel
Jack Keller's Seville Orange Wine
Wild Cyser
Future:
Stella-hopped Saison
Blackberry Wine or Bochet
Stout Bochet
Pith is offline
 
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