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Old 07-20-2011, 04:49 PM   #1
tannnick
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Default When to add fruit in flanders red?

I want to brew a flanders red. I want to either use roselare the whole time, or use abbey in the primary, then roselare in the secondary. My only problem is if I use roselare the whole time, when would I add the fruit? also, If I plan on using french oak chips, would I add the oak chips the same time as the blackberries?

I've read wild brews throughout and a good deal of other stuff, but am seeing mixed opinions. I have seen people sour the beers, the add the fruit for another fermentation. I have seen people add the fruit at secondary. I have seen people use roselare throughout, but then at which point would I add the fruit? Thanks for any insight.

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Old 07-20-2011, 04:55 PM   #2
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I'd recommend using Roeselare as your primary yeast. I haven't been pleased with the level of sourness otherwise. Most folks add fruit no sooner than 6 months.

I oaked mine when I racked off the cake into a secondary.

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Old 07-20-2011, 05:22 PM   #3
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How long should I let the primary go, til its dropped down? Then transfer and add the fruit and oak?

or let it primary for 6 months, then add the fruit? let it go for 6 months and transfer and add oak?

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Old 07-20-2011, 05:43 PM   #4
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For a Flanders Red, you want to rack off the cake when primary fermentation is complete. In my case I left it for about a month, then racked onto oak. I'd then fruit it at the 6 month mark, if I was going to.

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Old 07-22-2011, 12:32 AM   #5
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ok thanks for the response. I brewed today. I pitched Roselare Yeast on a 5.5 gal 16B Brown Porter using Pilsner, Munich, Aromatic, Flaked Wheat, Special B, and some Chocolate Malts. I boiled for 75+ minutes and added 2 oz Mt Hood at 60 min. I actually brewed a 11 gal batch and pitched London Ale on the other for a black berry brown.

Ideally, I need to ferment the Roselare til it is down, way down, right? I mean the sac yeast won't effect the outcome after a month or so, right?

Have you ever reused wood chips from another batch? I am about to finish a belgian that I added a bunch of brett and lacto to and will be kegging it "soon". It is about 8 months in the works. I only added the brett and lacto to drop the grav, not for souring purposes, that was why I added oak. Or maybe transfer on top of that yeast cake with all the brett, lacto, and sour mix and 2 oz french oak chips? What do you think about that?

Then I will add the fruit down the line. If I am not adding fruit soon, then I will pick something other than blackberries, unless they are still in the freezer!!

Thanks for your answers!

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Old 07-25-2011, 03:26 PM   #6
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2 oz seems like a lot of hops for a flanders. I usually toss in .5-.75oz depending on what the AA is. Too much AA will kill the bugs (which is why they used hops in beer to begin with).

The Sac yeast wont affect anything after primary fermentation is done (a couple of days). It gets the gravity low, then the bugs take over.

Personally I wouldnt transfer to a sour yeast cake unless your looking for a lot of sour flavor. The reason I wouldnt do it is because you could never repeat the results (not because it would necessarily turn out bad).

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Old 07-25-2011, 03:40 PM   #7
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This is a 11 gal batch. It really is only about 1 oz per 5.5 gallons. And I don't have my notes here now, but I want to say it was Mt. Hood at 4.7%. I made sure not to go with something too high.

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