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Old 12-14-2011, 02:09 AM   #1
Calder
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Default What yeast to use to start a Flanders

Ok, going to brew a Flanders Red later this month.

I'm going to start with Sacc and add the bugs later. I don't want to contaminant my main fermenters and will rack to several 5-liter glass jugs after 7 days and add the bugs then. The bug starter is already going.

I was planning on WLP550, but my basement is cool now and I would need to heat the fermenter. Not too much of a problem (swamp cooler + fish heater), but it is some extra work.

I have PacMan available, and it will be fine at basement temperatures (low 60s). Does the sacc yeast make much difference, after 12+ months on the bugs?

So should I use the PacMan, or should I make the extra effort to ferment the WLP550 warm (70s).

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Old 12-14-2011, 11:35 AM   #2
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My experience with using brett after the primary is that the esters created by belgian yeasts are in some way utilized by the brett. I have spiked a few sacch beers and instead of adding priming sugar to them I just added a squirt of brett to each bottle. When the corks pushed out I tossed them into the fridge. Well the results were interesting. The malt flavors were the same but the yeasty esters and phenolics were very much more subdued in the bretted bottles. So while I don't have a neutral yeast bottle with brett to compare it to, I am inclined to say use the Belgian sacch instead of a neutral one.

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Old 12-14-2011, 07:38 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calder View Post
Ok, going to brew a Flanders Red later this month.

I'm going to start with Sacc and add the bugs later. I don't want to contaminant my main fermenters and will rack to several 5-liter glass jugs after 7 days and add the bugs then. The bug starter is already going.

I was planning on WLP550, but my basement is cool now and I would need to heat the fermenter. Not too much of a problem (swamp cooler + fish heater), but it is some extra work.

I have PacMan available, and it will be fine at basement temperatures (low 60s). Does the sacc yeast make much difference, after 12+ months on the bugs?

So should I use the PacMan, or should I make the extra effort to ferment the WLP550 warm (70s).
Is your primary fermenter a glass carboy? If so there is no worry of contaminating it, plastic on the other hand would be a concern.

Regardless of the primary strain you use, you may want to let the gravity decide when to rack to secondary and not time. After 7 days you maybe fermented so far down you will never get a good sourness. I think between 1.030 and 1.025 is a good time to rack. Some recipes call for .020, but I think thats too low.

Pacman is a beast so again if you decide to use it check your gravity at maybe 3 days. I like to use a low attenuating strain like Wyeast 1968 *if* I actually do intend to transfer and not just ferment everything in primary.
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Old 12-14-2011, 10:36 PM   #4
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I would skip the separate clean ale yeast and go directly to using one of the sour blends. They already have sacch in them, and letting the brett/bacteria get a chance at some of the nutrients/easily digestable sugars you get a more sour/funky/complex beer

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Old 12-15-2011, 10:41 PM   #5
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I plan to start 6 gallons in a 7 gallon plastic fermenter. It is used for other beers so I don't want to contaminate it. That's why i want to start out with just the sacc yeast.

I have a gallon of wort with the bugs going right now, which will be mixed with the main batch when I rack it to several smaller glass fermenters. These will then be stored in my crawl space.

I mash high to leave a lot for the bugs. Last time with WLP550, I left it 2 weeks and racked at 1.018 (OG = 1.056).

Again, I have the question; does the primary yeast make much difference. PacMan vs WLP550. I have both available to pitch.

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Old 12-15-2011, 10:42 PM   #6
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Just pitch Roeselare right away. No sacc.

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Old 12-17-2011, 03:13 AM   #7
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I would use the 550, the esters seem to make a difference, and I believe it is a bit less attenuating, leaving more food for the bugs to do their thing. That being said, you will likely have a very subtle "wild" flavor if you don't pitch the bugs up front. I was disappointed when I made my first version of a Flemish red the same way you are planning on doing it, and now I pitch the bugs up front. I also bought a second plastic bucket in which to ferment my clean beers.

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Old 12-17-2011, 04:17 AM   #8
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I haven't been too impressed with Roselare. I'd go with a belgian yeast, then transfer to secondary when the gravity is about 1.020. This will leave enough sugars for the bugs to work on. I'd pitch commerical dregs along with brett.

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Old 12-21-2011, 03:59 AM   #9
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I think using pacman would be a mistake. #1 because I don't like pacman yeast #2 making a belgian style beer with a neutral american ale yeast won't taste right. Same goes for the grain in my opinion, use belgian grains. I know you didn't mention what grains you're using, but it's a big pet peev of mine when US breweries use US malts when brewing belgian beers. They just don't taste right. If you're gonna brew something that is going to age for 1-2 years do it right the first time. Sorry, not meaning to rant .. just very passionate about belgian beers.

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Old 12-21-2011, 01:52 PM   #10
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I think using pacman would be a mistake. #1 because I don't like pacman yeast #2 making a belgian style beer with a neutral american ale yeast won't taste right. Same goes for the grain in my opinion, use belgian grains. I know you didn't mention what grains you're using, but it's a big pet peev of mine when US breweries use US malts when brewing belgian beers. They just don't taste right. If you're gonna brew something that is going to age for 1-2 years do it right the first time. Sorry, not meaning to rant .. just very passionate about belgian beers.
For a beer that is sititng on bugs for at least a year, especially roselare.. the primary yeast character is going to be absolutely non-existent.
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