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Old 04-23-2014, 06:58 PM   #11
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Great article, by the way, Mike. I really like how you laid out the logic of decision making for the variables you talked about in the article. It is a good summary of a lot of scattered information! Can't wait for your book!
Cheers! Hopefully the book does something similar for the whole process (my goal). I'm presenting an expanded version of the same topic at NHC in Grand Rapids as well.
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Old 04-24-2014, 03:47 AM   #12
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I thought I would chime in with a personal experience related to this. I was really sleepy one morning when I doughed in on a mild intended to mash at 158, and turned on the burner and recirculation to bump the temperature up a bit from 154. Before I knew, it my mash was already over 180 by the time I realized what I had done. I ended up with a very starchy wort just due to the lack of conversion.

Rather than dump it, I boiled it, racked it to a carboy, and dumped the dregs from a commercial sour beer in it. First week or two saw the signs of a typical saccharomyces fermentation. Then nothing for a month or two (or three?) and then I ended up with a nice pellicle formation.

It is now about a year and change later, and I have a delicious sour brown. Very lactic character to it, which is good because I'm not a big fan of acetic beers. So, while it was most certainly not a classic turbid mash, it ended up giving me exactly the fermentation character I was hoping for in a sour.

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Old 04-28-2014, 09:46 PM   #13
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Also, Oldsock/Michael Tonsmeire has an article in this month's Zymurgy about this topic...
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I've had good luck with turbid mashes, but they are far from required. The big issue with sour beers is that even the same wort pitched with the same microbes can result in wildly different beers. Makes experiments and comparisons difficult. I'm a big advocate of diversification of process/microbes/fermentors and blending.
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Cheers! Hopefully the book does something similar for the whole process (my goal). I'm presenting an expanded version of the same topic at NHC in Grand Rapids as well.
Agreed, great article. I found it extremely helpful. I can't wait to check out the book! Anyone know when it drops?
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Old 04-29-2014, 01:36 PM   #14
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Agreed, great article. I found it extremely helpful. I can't wait to check out the book! Anyone know when it drops?
The current goal is to have copies at NHC. Not sure how long before/after that Amazon et al. will get their hands on it.
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Old 04-30-2014, 02:23 PM   #15
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I turbid mash and have had great results. I've brewed without turbid mashing and also had great results.

Personally, I like the turbid mash because it seems to produce great beers and leaves plenty of food for 'everyone' to chew on. I also get some warm fuzzy feeling from thinking that I am brewing using methods similar to the way previous lambic brewers did (when they were taxed on their mash tun, rather than their finished product).

That being said, it is quite a process... however once you've done it is is less daunting the following times.

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